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Moving from child tax credit to universal credit

(19 Posts)
wheresthepinkyponk Sat 18-Mar-17 19:30:36

Wondering if anyone can help with information regarding moving from child tax credits to universal credit. Have 3 children under 9. Youngest is 4. I havnt worked since 2nd child was born due to being unable to find childcare suitable for after school, school holidays etc. No friends or family to help. Husband works and earns approx £19,500 per annum. We live in a mortgaged house so money is tight and we rely on child tax credits (£590 a month) to survive on along with child benefit. I spoke to someone at the universal credits helpline as I was told child tax credits are being stopped within the next year and I will have to apply for universal credit. Man I spoke to says they don't offer universal credit to home owners at the moment. Does this mean once child tax credits stop, we won't get any financial help other than child benefit?

busyboysmum Sat 18-Mar-17 19:34:15

Universal credit: When will tax credits stop?
Existing tax credit claimants are currently unaffected by the roll-out of UC. Their awards of tax credits will continue at present until DWP introduce rules to migrate those people across to UC. DWP current plans are to migrate remaining tax credit claimants to UC from July 2019 to March 2022.

busyboysmum Sat 18-Mar-17 19:34:48

Looks like you've got a bit of time left.

Akire Sat 18-Mar-17 19:37:58

It's pain even if do get housing benefit, my housing association have made everyone pay a month rent in advance over the last year (took me ages as disabled) as when we move from housing benefit to UC it will be paid 6 weeks in arrears not two weeks like it is now.

Suppose we are luckily. Given if you end up having to claim if lose your job your landlord could well kick off in the 6/8 weeks before first payment.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 19:40:28

As you have three children the earliest you would be moved to UC would be November 2018.
You will be migrated some time after this date but only when you area is a full digital area and can accept people who don't rent.
Not being able to claim UC currently is a positive thing.

wheresthepinkyponk Sat 18-Mar-17 20:22:08

Thanks so much for replies. I was told that universal credits was a gradual thing being introduced. I know things are alright at the moment ,but the future worries me. I don't feel it's right to leave my kids at home by themselves before the youngest is 10 and that's not for another 6 years. I know no one has a crystal ball but hopefully we will be o.k.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 20:28:53

With UC you will have work conditionality but as your dh earns 35 hours NMW x 1 1/2 you will not need to work until your youngest dc turns 13. At that point you will need to earn 35 hours NMW x 2.
As you are not going to claim the housing element you will have a higher earnings disregard. You will be able to earn more money before your UC is tapered off at approx 65p to the £1.

wheresthepinkyponk Sat 18-Mar-17 20:36:56

The £19,500 my husband earns is before tax. Hopefully I will be able to find some overnight type work.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 20:39:04

It's is calculated gross so you are fine.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 20:41:10

£18,291gross is the amount you need to earn between you until your youngest dc turns 13.

Nzou1050 Sat 18-Mar-17 20:48:27

Andknowitsseven sorry for the hijack but can I ask you about this too? Tried googling but not sure if the responses. I have 2 DC & am not working. DH earns £15500 & we get child tax credits. Would the same apply when we are moved to universal credit i.e I wouldn't have to work til youngest is 13?

NaiceBiscuits Sat 18-Mar-17 21:12:11

And what's the threshold if you're a single parent, please?

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 22:16:34

£13,104 Naice once your child is 13, before the age of 13 it should be £7,488 if your job coach agrees you can only work the equivalent of twenty hours due to caring for your dc.
Those are based on the current nmw due to go up in April.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 22:20:38

Nzou1050 you would need to earn £4156 annually ( will increase after April) that will make your household earnings nmw x 1 1/2 . When your youngest dc turns 13 you will need to earn £26,208 between you.
If you don't earn those amounts you will need to job search in the same way as current job seekers claimants.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 22:23:30

Sorry wjeresthepinky pork the figure I gave you was based on the old nmw amounts . The actual amount is £19,656 gross.

Nzou1050 Sat 18-Mar-17 23:08:31

Thanks Andnowitsseven so are the rules basically if your a couple you need to earn nmw x 35 hours x 1.5 if you have children under 13 then when the youngest gets to 13 as a couple you have to earn nmw x 35 hours x 2? If you earn more than nmw you can work less hours because it's the income that counts not the actual hours? Do both parents have to work or could one of the couple meet the requirements for both of you IYSWIM? Sorry for all the questions

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 23:43:54

Yes Nzou those earning are correct. It doesn't matter how many hours you work, or who in the couple works the hours as long as you earn the required household amount.
If you claim childcare both of you will need to work ( but no minimum hours like ctc) . If one if you is a carer or unable to work due to ill health then only one of you needs to work to claim childcare.

AndKnowItsSeven Sat 18-Mar-17 23:50:02

Also a in household where one partner is a carer or incapacitated, they will have no earning requirement.
Their partner will have to earn nmw x 20 child under 13 and nmw x 35 for older children.

wheresthepinkyponk Sun 19-Mar-17 20:03:17

Thanks for update on earnings. Dh gets a taxable bonus of £500 gross so that will push his earnings over the amount needed until I return to work.

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