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Please can anyone help re. Critical illness cover? A bit desperate :(

(12 Posts)
SugarSkyHigh Mon 12-Sep-11 08:45:09

DH has had suspected mini-stroke. We don't have critical illness cover. Is it possible to take cover out at this late stage, seeing as he has not yet had a diagnosis? Or is it too late?

I've looked at various cover plans online but have gone cross-eyed and i'm hoping someone on here might know. Thank you anyone who can tell me anything <feeling desperate emotcion>

Basically he is worried (and so am I)! what will happen to me and 3 DCs if he has to give up work.

OddBoots Mon 12-Sep-11 08:47:48

I'm afraid it would count as a pre-existing condition now as he has (presumably) had medical treatment and the notes would state the symptoms. You could call a broker and ask direct though if you really want to try.

CMOTdibbler Mon 12-Sep-11 08:50:26

Its too late to take it out now as the condition would be preexisting, even without a diagnosis

SugarSkyHigh Mon 12-Sep-11 10:50:28

OK, fair enough.
if he could no longer work would he get some kind of disability benefit from the government? thanks for answers!

CogitoErgoSometimes Mon 12-Sep-11 12:19:35

He would be assessed as to what kind of work, if any, he could do and there is some extra help available depending on how limited he is. Employers sometimes have a provision for anyone that has to retire due to ill-health. Try not to be too gloomy, however. If he is receiving medical care now then he is under observation and will be given treatment, practical advice and follow-up appointments to help prevent a recurrence. This puts him in a better position than someone who thinks they are in perfect health but isn't.

Lizcat Mon 12-Sep-11 13:16:55

Please look on the positive side I know 3 people who had this in their late 30s/early 40s who are completely back to normal and have a very normal life. One of these was found collapsed and the air ambulance whisked him off.

SugarSkyHigh Mon 12-Sep-11 22:09:36

my goodness that is definitely encouraging! thank you so much for your replies everybody smile

aliceliddell Mon 12-Sep-11 22:21:57

yy Lizcat, I too know 2 youngish (30/40) people who recovered very well. Loads of physio is essential asap.
The benefit rules now are a bit tight; your local council disability unit might have a benefits advisor who will help. If you are the carer you get £55 p/w, the disabled person gets Employment Support Allowance. Also, Council Tax benefit, free prescriptions etc.
Join groups, get on t'interweb for more info. Be warned, the Coalition are tightening the screws on claimants.

aliceliddell Mon 12-Sep-11 22:25:08

Try Benefit Claimants Fight Back on facebook. Get ready to cultivate a strong sense of entitlement!
Good luck!.

DaisySteiner Mon 12-Sep-11 22:28:02

Ditto, I know somebody who had a stroke in her 40s and has fully recovered. She was on sick leave for a bit, but her employers held her job open.

Northernlurker Mon 12-Sep-11 22:32:06

Ok well the mini stroke is a warning of a problem. This should now be investigated and depending on the cause then various treatments are available so that he stays well. Yes it's too late for critical illness - but hopefully you'll never need that anyway. If he does become seriously ill - or you do - then hospitals have social workers attached to them to help people find their way through this sort of scenario.

SugarSkyHigh Tue 13-Sep-11 10:34:00

yes we are waiting for a referring to a TIA clinic and will take it from there. Encouraging to hear that various treatments are available presumably to lessen the likelihood of a major stroke. I really hope he doesn't need to stop work - not just from the money point of view, either!

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