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Rejected by solicitor - no reason given

(14 Posts)
Magicroundabout321 Wed 13-Mar-19 14:04:51

We used the service of a solicitor a few years ago and were very happy with him. His final letter to us said it was a pleasure acting for us and he hopes to have th opportunity of doing so again in the future.

We need a solicitor again now for a very similar task so returned to him. He has now retired, so we asked his colleague. The colleagues worked together and were joint directors.

They refused to help and gave us the number of another local solicitor instead.

I asked what the reason was for them not helping us this time and not even giving us an appointment. They didn't have a reason.

Is this ethical? Shouldn't they give a reason e.g. too busy, not their area of expertise etc?

We have since contacted the solicitor who acted for the other party last time, who is happy to help. We therefore have someone now, but I can't help but feel rather hurt somehow and that this can't be right.

If they don't have to give a reason, it could mean that e.g. racism or whatever could go unchecked, wouldn't it? I don't mean that was the reason in our particular case, but I do wonder what was.

Thanks for your thoughts on this.

Tomtontom Wed 13-Mar-19 14:09:40

His final letter to us said it was a pleasure acting for us and he hopes to have th opportunity of doing so again in the future.

It's a line. They don't really mean it.

Perhaps the remaining solicitor has enough work on, or is winding down too?

They don't have to give a reason. Your reaction of feeling "rather hurt" is extreme.

Magicroundabout321 Wed 13-Mar-19 14:16:41

Hi Tomtontom

Oh good to hear you think my reaction is extreme. In my own profession we'd give a reason, so I'm probably just accustomed to that level of 'kindness' or whatever you want to call it. I have very rarely used the service of a solicitor.

Yes, I realise the final line was standard, but it shows that there were no problems or animosity etc last time to explain this now (I doubt their final letter would have finished that way if there had been).

I read on this website that solicitors do have to give a reason:
www.lawsociety.org.uk/support-services/help-for-solicitors/practice-advice-service/q-and-as/refusing-a-service/

Magicroundabout321 Wed 13-Mar-19 14:18:45

I'm not going to lodge any complaints anywhere about this; I was just wondering if it is normal practice for solicitors to respond this way.

Magicroundabout321 Wed 13-Mar-19 14:22:09

It sounds as though it is normal behaviour for solicitors, so thanks! My question's been answered.

cranstonmanor Wed 13-Mar-19 14:22:27

I think you're overreacting. Apparantly they don't need new clients now. Why is this a big deal to you?

SymphonyofShadows Wed 13-Mar-19 14:23:06

We had this recently with a conveyancing solicitor. The original one had retired from the practice. They too gave us names of others. I didn’t for one moment question their ethics or feel hurt.

cranstonmanor Wed 13-Mar-19 14:24:09

*
If they don't have to give a reason, it could mean that e.g. racism or whatever could go unchecked, wouldn't it? I don't mean that was the reason in our particular case, but I do wonder what was.*

Riiiiiight.... so you really think that a racist person is going to put that into writing? Of course they're going to give a bullshit reason if it's because they're racist.

TheVanguardSix Wed 13-Mar-19 14:27:29

We had a similar situation. I just assumed that they were too snowed under to represent us. Or maybe they just didn't want to. The important thing is that you get the legal representation sorted. That's the bottom line. Feelings just don't come into it... not with those legal fees!

Collaborate Wed 13-Mar-19 15:01:15

Perhaps there was a conflict of interest? It would be improper for them to have revealed who they might have acted for to make it a conflict. You give no details of the nature of the instructions so it's impossible to speculate further.

Cloudtree Wed 13-Mar-19 15:07:58

Blimey, I say no to taking on clients all the time. It's generally because I'm snowed under and I know that if I take on any more cases I will do everyone a disservice. Otherwise it's because I don't like working for individuals because many of them they don't like paying their bills. Or it could be because its a type of work I don't find interesting, or its because I don't feel they have a good case and I don't like running losing cases. Some firms don't even take on work for particular types of client, so for example my last firm changed their approach and decided they would never act for individuals, only for businesses.

I wouldn't take it personally.

Magicroundabout321 Wed 13-Mar-19 17:32:38

Hi everyone

Thank you all for your replies!

I think it comes down to how it was said & done, not what was done.

In any case, as I wrote back at 14:22, my question's been answered :-)

ScarletBitch Wed 13-Mar-19 17:41:26

Could be conflict of interest.

Magicroundabout321 Tue 19-Mar-19 18:50:30

Hi ScarletBitch

thanks for the suggestion. It can't be the reason here, but I can imagine it often is.

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