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The NHS was effectively abolished in 2012?

(14 Posts)
RosiePosiePuddle Fri 26-Jan-18 22:06:22

The "health and social care act" in 2012 passed me by completely. I am trying to process how significant and inevitable the consequences of this act are. Is the crisis in the NHS a direct result of this act?

I always suspected that the Tories would privatise the NHS. It appears that they set up the mechanism to do it with this act in 2012. It was apparently too boring and/complicated for me at least and most of the population.

Here is a link to an old article: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/mar/30/health-act-means-death-of-nhs

Some quotes:

Very few people understand its implications but it will affect each of us arguably more than any other legislation passed in our lifetimes

The Health and Social Care Act effectively legislates against free, universal, comprehensive healthcare.

Rationing of care will become more widespread until we have a two-tier system in which the haves will take out private insurance and the have-nots will be looked after by a third-class health service.

Allyson pollock has spoken a lot about thishttps://youtu.be/dDenWBGv3KE

I am currently looking into this more and am interested in more information and perspectives.

RosiePosiePuddle Fri 26-Jan-18 22:07:53

Clicky links (hopefully)

www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/mar/30/health-act-means-death-of-nhs

youtu.be/dDenWBGv3KE

annandale Fri 26-Jan-18 22:12:06

Yup.

Andrew Lansley delivered on fucking over the NHS and then left politics to take a job with Bain Consulting as a healthcare specialist. I doubt it pays the average salary. A worthy successor to Aneurin Bevan.

prh47bridge Sat 27-Jan-18 19:59:11

The changes introduced by the Health & Social Care Act have been in operation for several years now. The NHS still seems to be going strong. And it is very odd to say that an act that requires the government to provide free, universal, comprehensive healthcare is actually legislating against free, universal, comprehensive healthcare. I'm afraid this is the usual "Tories will dismantle the NHS" rubbish.

SilverySurfer Sat 27-Jan-18 22:55:34

prh47bridge totally agree.

I've been going to my doctor's surgery three times a week for the last few months - haven't been charged yet. Will be having an operation shortly - haven't received an invoice.

I know left wingers are absolutely desperate to peddle this rubbish but it makes them look ridiculous because it's patently untrue.

Jux Fri 02-Feb-18 19:11:51

NHS and Community Care Act under Thatcher started the rot.

RosiePosiePuddle Mon 12-Feb-18 10:25:28

The NHS still seems to be going strong.

I live abroad. Believe me the nhs is not going strong. Compared to the health service where I live it isn't. On the other hand the health care is not free here. But on a third hand, this is not a low-wage economy like the UK and the middle classes are happy to contribute to their health while there is a state provision (in a much healthier) state than the NHS for those can't or won't pay.

Reading around this more.
The duty of the health Secretary to provide health care was abolished to allow private companies in. NHS funding is paying private companies to provide care and allowing them to choose their provisions. Also half of NHS services have been given to private companies meaning that they can use half of the NHS beds and services for paying customers. This is predicted to allow us-style insurance to come in.

I reckon that unless Labour get in and manage to reverse it (unlikely), then in 10 years we will have a two tier system.

I actually think those who earn enough should pay something towards their health care. But not in the manner in which it is being snuck in the back door like this.

000bourneFarm Mon 12-Feb-18 10:34:02

I live abroad. Believe me the nhs is not going strong. Compared to the health service where I live it isn't. On the other hand the health care is not free here. But on a third hand, this is not a low-wage economy like the UK and the middle classes are happy to contribute to their health while there is a state provision (in a much healthier) state than the NHS for those can't or won't pay.

This is an irrelevant comment. What is the point in comparing a country with a completely different economic system and demographics with the UK? Especially as you have not identified the country you are talking about and why you perceive the system to be so much better.

ARealWoman Mon 12-Feb-18 10:37:32

Dude you don’t even live here anymore

RosiePosiePuddle Mon 12-Feb-18 11:13:06

I am British and my family is British. The future of the health care of the country in which my grandma is suffering from dementia in and my mum will die in is important to me. Don't get me started on my father's death. In the UK, as a result of inadequate diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Also we will return one day. And we can't afford private health care in the UK.

Also I would like to discuss this. I think it is important. The whole point of me starting this thread is to try to talk about it before it gets to a point of no return.

Australia. It isn't perfect but there is no denying it is better.

Attacking people who point out that the NHS isn't as good as it could be will not change how it is going.

Bluelady Mon 12-Feb-18 11:23:09

The NHS is in shag order. Ambulances queued up outside rammed A&Es, hospital beds blocked because step down beds have been culled, £millions wasted on competition tendering of services, 40k shortage of nurses, the list goes on and on. All since 2010.

For the decade before that money was poured in to correct the previous government's running down of the NHS, all squandered by this government. If you want to know how bad it is in the NHS as someone, anyone who works in it.

000bourneFarm Mon 12-Feb-18 11:51:21

OP I am very firmly behind the NHS and it is the best organisation by far I have encountered. The quality of the people providing care, at the point of care, is second to none when it comes to professionalism. They know what needs to be done.

Anyone who starts to make the NHS a political issue serves no one. The PFI is coming home to roost and do not forget most of that spend was on the Brown/Blair watch.

Oh, and its an international thing not a UK thing. The golden years have ended. No political party should set the strategy for the NHS. The government in power should seek advice from doctors. The part the government should then play is to bring forward legislation to curb the excesses of private companies.

ApacheEchidna Mon 12-Feb-18 12:16:31

the middle classes are happy to contribute to their health

WE DO. WE ARE.

The NHS is not free. We are already paying for it. I had my tax statement through from the government the other day and between us DH and I are contributing nearly £4,000 per year to the NHS. That's over £300 per month. Meanwhile we could get fully comprehensive health insurance cover for less than £200 per month to cover the whole family.

I love and support the NHS and I don't want it to be privatised but it is not free.

Everyone pays according to their means, instead of according to the misfortunes of their family medical history. That is fair and right. Everyone gets treatment according to their needs not according to their wallet. That is fair and right.

No one should be making a profit out of this.

Bluelady Mon 12-Feb-18 12:47:54

It's a UK problem n that our government decides how to spend our money and this one is systematically running the NHS into the ground with its private provider supporters lining their pockets. Yes through PFI but also through all the contracts awarded after 2012.

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