Talk

Advanced search

Drunk MP's hectoring Jeremy Corbyn in House Of Commons?

(72 Posts)
theunfairersex Wed 11-Nov-15 23:58:06

I was watching an old episode of Loose Women the other day and they were saying there are eight bars in the houses of parliament and quite often some MP's are so drunk they don't know what they are voting for.

That got me thinking. I showed my friend Prime Ministers questions from 28th October (she had never watched it before, you can find it here www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja0kF9piIL0 starts at 1m 08 secs.)

She was disgusted and said a lot of the MP's looked and sounded drunk and if they are voting on things like sending our servicemen to war and other serious stuff they should be breath tested.

Does anyone else think they should be breath tested before they debate or vote? And is it reasonable to have eight bars in your place of work?

Who else do you know that can go to work drunk and get away with it?

I, like Carol Vorderman, certainly thought they should be breathalysed, so I started a petition on UK Parliament which you can sign here if you agree
petition.parliament.uk/petitions/111295

ouryve Thu 12-Nov-15 00:03:44

Well, now Carol Vorderman is a thread all of hrer own (and has had a few after her political suicide on BBCQT, that time, but I agree that, like in so many jobs, MPs should be subject to random alcohol and drug testing.

Canyouforgiveher Thu 12-Nov-15 00:16:09

You should read Alan Clark's Diaries where he describes a Labour MP (female) using parliamentary language to say he was drunk at question time (he was as he freely admits)

theunfairersex Thu 12-Nov-15 00:24:31

I'm not sure I would trust any celebrity's political views, including Carol Vorderman grin I also trust almost no politicians political views.

But I did think it was a good idea to not just randomly test MP's for drink but do it before every debate and vote.

After all, they hold a lot more responsibility than most of us but the face they show the public in parliament is often a disgrace!

theunfairersex Thu 12-Nov-15 08:41:12

I think I'd prefer not to read a book by Alan Clark.

Surely he is the poster boy for everything that persists in politics that is unpalatable?

UnGoogleable Sat 14-Nov-15 12:17:43

Their behaviour is disgusting

Frankly, the very idea that these people who we elect to represent us and make important decisions on our behalf need policing in this way is just hideous. Of course, they'll never agree to breath testing though, so what is needed is some other way to control their juvenile, irresponsible behaviour.

THey need a strong speaker, who doesn't allow any shit. I like Bercow, but he seems to enjoy the banter a bit too much sometimes.

Mr Corbyn on the other hand, is like a stern headteacher pouring a bucket of cold water over these drunken buffoons. He is exactly what is needed to show these idiots up for what they are. I just hope he keeps doing what he's doing, and ramps up the pressure.

theunfairersex Sat 14-Nov-15 18:01:11

Well, maybe Mr Corbyn is what is needed, however, if you look at how much The Mail, Telegraph, Sun, Times and all the other papers lie and bully him, he will never get a fair hearing.

Whatever you think of him, it seems quite horrible that even though he seems to be very respectful and nice, that even when he spent last weekend talking to war veterans and their families after all the rest such as Cameron etc had gone to a VIP lunch, The Sun et al were still looking for a way to drag his name through the mud.

Mr Corbyn went to pay respect to the victims of war and The Sun and all their cronies, turned up looking for an opportunity to be nasty to him, not respect our war dead.

That is disgraceful, they obviously don't respect our fallen soldiers.

And you are right, they may never agree to being breathalysed in the House of Commons.

But, if by some weird long shot, the petition got to 100,000 signatures, there would have to be a debate in the House of Commons and then, we would have to hear from these bullies why they think it is ok for them to drink in the house while they are supposedly working on behalf of us.

The reasons for that would be worth hearing.

Wouldn't they?

partialderivative Mon 16-Nov-15 18:39:59

How many other professions (maybe airline pilots) are breathalysed before they do their work?

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 06:01:22

A fine bit of whataboutery, partialderivative, but it does not stand up to scrutiny, does it?

What other job do people have responsibility for national security? Are you saying drunkards should be allowed to vote on whether or not we go to war in Syria?

Consider this.....

.......alcohol disrupts the normal flow of neurotransmitters across the cortex’s synaptic connections, leading us to enter an altered state. The first thing to go is our inhibitions, which the booze-free cortex would typically keep in check. We become more talkative and assured, and our better judgment begins to slip away.

I mean, who wouldn't want our MP's being talkative and assured without their better judgment? That way, once they've lost their inhibitions our MP's can vote for numerous illegal wars that kill our servicemen and ultimately displace millions of people, causing a worldwide refugee crisis, which in turn can be used as partial cover for terrorist attacks killing 130 innocent people in Paris (even thopugh it appears no refugees were involved) and generally spreading fear and terror across the whole world, without giving a fig! What's not to like? Cheers!

It's more than likely that the decisions that lead to the the above scenario, were only mildly influenced by alcohol but as the decisions were so obviously stupid, how about we take alcohol out of the equation, as it's obviously not doing any good?

Furthermore, take a look at this list of dangerous drugs and have a think about if you would want our MP's high and voting on anything that scores below alcohol at No. 5? www.theguardian.com/science/2009/nov/02/david-nutt-dangerous-drug-list

Tootsiepops Tue 17-Nov-15 06:38:09

PMQs starts at 12pm on Weds. MPs would have to be pretty committed to alcohol to show up drunk...

It's the late votes that are the issue. Although in reality, the party whips are there to ensure MPs vote as they are told (their votes are not 'free choice'), so as long as someone shepards them through the appropriate lobby, they can be pissed as a fart and it not make much difference. And there are many more sober MPs who don't know what issue they are voting on - they're just doing what they're told by the Whip and toeing the party line.

As for the number of bars, Parliament makes a lot of money off the bars and restaurants on site as it's not just MPs who use them. As a member of the public, you can go and have a champagne afternoon tea there during the summer. And goodness knows, with the monumental amount of money needed for repair of the building, it needs as much of an independent revenue stream as it can muster at the moment.

Do I think MPs should be drinking during working hours? No. But the majority of them are not drinking themselves stupid - they're having a glass of wine with dinner on the evenings they have to be at work until 10pm to vote. I don't find that too objectionable even if I find the majority of MPs so.

There are exceptions, of course. Charles Kennedy, for example. But he was an alcoholic sad and would have been an alcoholic with or without Parliament.

One further point, if a petition reaches 100,000 signatures, it is considered for debate. It isn't a given.

I'm not defending MPs for the sake of it - I think most of them are arseholes grin, but at the moment, with all that's happening with the refugees, with Paris, with Syria, with IS, I'd much rather parliamentary time was given to other issues.

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 08:12:19

Thanks for reminding everybody when PMQ's starts. It is as well that everyone is reminded of this so they can watch and decide for themselves.

I for one would be hoping that PMQ's this week would show better behaviour given the gravity of events rather than the newly established derisory hectoring of Mr Corbyn that has shamed the house over the last few weeks.....

PMQs starts at 12pm on Weds. MPs would have to be pretty committed to alcohol to show up drunk...

I invite you to check the link to PMQ's on October 28th above, what else can you attribute that terrible behaviour to? If children were to act like that at school, they would be sent home at least for the day, if not, excluded for a period!

Pay particular reference to the speakers tone at one point when he says that if the session has to take longer for the questions to be heard 'so be it.' Sounds like a teacher chastising children in a classroom. It's a disgrace!

It's the late votes that are the issue. Although in reality, the party whips are there to ensure MPs vote as they are told (their votes are not 'free choice'), so as long as someone shepards them through the appropriate lobby, they can be pissed as a fart and it not make much difference. And there are many more sober MPs who don't know what issue they are voting on - they're just doing what they're told by the Whip and toeing the party line.

Absolutely agree, we are supposed to live in a democracy and the idea of a debating chamber is that our elected officials go there to hear reasoned argument and debate and then make a reasoned decision on the best researched and well argued points. This is not possible with a whip system and the likelihood of any reasoned points being heard is all but vanquished with only a drop or two of alcohol on top.

As for the number of bars, Parliament makes a lot of money off the bars and restaurants on site as it's not just MPs who use them. As a member of the public, you can go and have a champagne afternoon tea there during the summer. And goodness knows, with the monumental amount of money needed for repair of the building, it needs as much of an independent revenue stream as it can muster at the moment.

The revenue the bars generate is not a drop in the ocean compared to what is needed to renovate the building, however, lets market the bars and get more of the public in so they can see what goes on inside, generate more revenue and at the same time ban MP's from taking part in debates and voting if they have been drinking alcohol in a bar before.

Do I think MPs should be drinking during working hours? No. But the majority of them are not drinking themselves stupid - they're having a glass of wine with dinner on the evenings they have to be at work until 10pm to vote. I don't find that too objectionable even if I find the majority of MPs so.

It doesn't matter if a majority aren't drinking themselves stupid, lets once again refer to the link of PMQ's above and it seems pretty clear that a sizable majority are abusing the position of trust in this way. Granted, the front benches look pretty healthy these days and I would go so far as saying my local MP doesn't behave in this way and does a good job for his constituents, whether I agree with his politics or not. But the braying and hectoring isn't coming from the front bench. A good look at the eyes and the statures of those on the back benches will give you at least a half reasonable guide as to who is irresponsible and making bad personal choices as to what they put in their bodies whilst at work (and before and after!)

As you say, Charles Kennedy was an alcoholic, so let's leave him out of this one.

One further point, if a petition reaches 100,000 signatures, it is considered for debate. It isn't a given.

True enough, I'll give you that.

I'm not defending MPs for the sake of it - I think most of them are arseholes grin, but at the moment, with all that's happening with the refugees, with Paris, with Syria, with IS, I'd much rather parliamentary time was given to other issues.

This is a bit of a strawman argument, just to say there is other bad stuff going on in the world that we shouldn't do something to make our political system more sane and our MP's more accountable.

It is for the very reason that there are serious decisions to be made that we should make sure our MP's are as level headed as possible whilst making them. They should make decisions for the best of reasons and with the best of intentions, not because they are toeing the party line and are scared of the whip and certainly not because they are high on alcohol or drugs.

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 08:17:27

sizable majority are abusing the position of trust

whoops......should read sizable minority..

claig Tue 17-Nov-15 09:14:59

'But the majority of them are not drinking themselves stupid'

Then how do you explain their actions?

'they're having a glass of wine with dinner on the evenings they have to be at work until 10pm to vote. '

That's what they say! I believe them but thousands wouldn't.

'I'm not defending MPs for the sake of it - I think most of them are arseholes grin '

You'll find no disagreement on Mumsnet with that fact.

claig Tue 17-Nov-15 09:16:37

'Then how do you explain their actions?'

Coming from Oxbridge does not explain it. Alcohol probably plays a significant part.

SheGotAllDaMoves Tue 17-Nov-15 09:17:07

It appears that the hectoring he got from his own MPs yesterday was nothing to do with alcohol!

claig Tue 17-Nov-15 09:18:20

'on the evenings they have to be at work until 10pm'

Work?

They don't know what work is. Let's get serious.

NicoleWatterson Tue 17-Nov-15 09:21:12

For goodness sake what is wrong with politicians if it's us that had to suggest 'it's not a good idea to drink at work'

I'm not sure anyone whose judgement is that skewed should be making decisions about our country.

My understanding was the bars are hugely subsidised - but that's only hearsay from someone who worked there so I'm happy to be corrected.

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 09:21:53

It appears that the hectoring he got from his own MPs yesterday was nothing to do with alcohol

Not really sure how that adds to the debate at all. This is a non partisan issue and applies to all parties, it's just PMQ's has been the most notable example recently.

NicoleWatterson Tue 17-Nov-15 09:23:17

'they're having a glass of wine with dinner on the evenings they have to be at work until 10pm to vote.

So you'd be happy with bus drivers doing that? Lorry drivers? Pilots?

No of course not, because it affects your judgement.

claig Tue 17-Nov-15 09:24:09

Yes, the bars are subsidised. We pay for it, as per usual.

'but that's only hearsay from someone who worked there'

I dread to think what else that person who worked there and witnessed it at first hand has to say about what went on.

Believeitornot Tue 17-Nov-15 09:29:44

Do any of you know what MPs actually do?

I'd be interested to hear answers?
Not cabinet ministers like Iain Duncan smith, but those representing their local constituencies?

They're laughing all the way to the bank. In between each election they're accountable to no one really. Disgraceful.

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 09:31:13

NicoleWatterson grin What is wrong with them, indeed????

Here is a link to an article in The Telegraph last year with some facts and figures. Doesn't sound like the bars are actually doing well on bringing in revenue.

Don't miss this little cheeky nugget in the article :

Usually the Commons publishes figures that offset sales of souvenirs and gifts against spending on its catering service

The good news is that this year our taxpayer subsidy for this will only be £3 million

Now, tell me again why hard working people should have their tax credits reduced?

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 09:32:03

Forgot the link!!!

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/11024713/6-million-taxpayer-subsidy-for-Parliament-bars.html

claig Tue 17-Nov-15 09:34:37

'The good news is that this year our taxpayer subsidy for this will only be £3 million'

£3 million?

There are only 650 of them. Are they tanked up to the eyeballs at public expense?

We know they laught at us, but this is taking the piss in the drunken pissed sense.

theunfairersex Tue 17-Nov-15 09:46:55

There are only 650 of them. Are they tanked up to the eyeballs at public expense?

That's just £4,615.38 for each MP!

Fantastic value, surely! wink

Especially at a time when we are having to get rid of most of the police force. What's not to like? wine

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now