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Why would anyone consider going to Rugby school better than the mixed local comp?

(716 Posts)
Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 01:02:08

I read this article in the standard earleir, and just thought what is this headmaster on? Why is this scholarship presented as such a huge honour for the boy, when in fact it is a way of the school paying to improve its results by taking in some of the best sixth form students without fees.

What "lifechanging" opportunities does he expect he can offer, which Hassenbrook acadamy can't?

www.standard.co.uk/news/london/needs-pic-teenage-footballer-wins-70000-scholarship-to-boarding-school-that-invented-rugby-a2953791.html

Headmaster Peter Green said he hoped Michael and other Arnold Foundation scholars would have a “ripple effect” on their communities when they return home.

He said: “We might be able to be transformative and transform their lives. Then when they go to university, and after, they can start to transform their own local communities. It’s not about parachuting someone out of that. We want to keep their association with where they are from.”

What a snob. Does he think the staff at Hassenbrook only teach poor peoples maths and physics, and the maths at Rugby is somehow a better class of maths? perhaps he thinks the laws of physics perform better there too?

I hope this lad has fun, but I don't think for a moment his life is going to be in any way better because he spent two years mixing with rich snobs rather than normal people.

Want2bSupermum Thu 24-Sep-15 01:24:07

The school he came from obviously thinks he is academically talented. Often schools like Rugby do a great job of helping their pupils through the UCAS application process. They also tend to be much more experienced at preparing their pupils for the Oxbridge application process.

At a school like Rugby you study a whole host of subjects during 6th form and comp's don't always offer this. We called it complementary studies and honestly it is this that set apart my education. I was taught about everything from housekeeping (was stuff like applying for a mortgage, making sure you were heating your home efficiently, how to repair and alter clothing etc) to art history and music. This education has enabled me to be able to mix with all sorts of people and has come in more handy that my A'Levels ever did.

Finally I find it offensive that you think everyone who is rich is a snob. The two are no synonymous. There are plenty of poor people who are complete snobs too. The boy didn't have to take the place and I am sure his family are pleased he has been given this opportunity.

Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 01:40:29

I'm not saying everyone rich is a snob, but this headmaster certainly is.

We called it complementary studies and we call it PHSE....

Often schools like Rugby do a great job of helping their pupils through the UCAS application process. They also tend to be much more experienced at preparing their pupils for the Oxbridge application process.

and comps don't do this? and don't have experience in this? That is a really snobby attitude in itself.

Want2bSupermum Thu 24-Sep-15 02:07:13

It isn't snobby at all. Look at the numbers going to Oxbridge. Something like 50% come from private school while 7% of the population attend private school. I know the comps my friends went to didn't get anywhere near the same amount of help that we got with our applications for university. Their Oxbridge prep was a joke compared to what my school did.

Friends I made at university that came from local comps considered themselves as having made it. For me I had failed because at my school approx. 50% went to Oxbridge at the time. Going to RG universities was 2nd best. Also many of my friends who had gone to the local comp had the grades for Oxbridge but no one had even suggested they apply. That would never have happened at my school. If they thought there was a 50% chance you would benefit from Oxbridge they insisted that you apply.

Let me also tell you about the careers help they offered. Want an internship, no problem, you name it they knew someone in the field you were interested in. We had an alumnae group in positions from an astronaut to professional actors, authors and botanists. Then there were the parents. Friend was thinking about being a hairdresser, no problem she interned with a famous one and left at 16 to train as a hairdresser. Another friend interned with a professional musician whose daughter had attended the school. My friend who went to a local comp was told a career in radio wasn't for the likes of her. Others also got the same treatment. What rubbish. It was drilled into us that its up to you to make the most of your life. Figure out what is important and set goals to achieve. If someone says no ask again. It is this resiliency/confidence that has set my post graduate experience apart from my peers at university who had come from comps.

Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 02:20:35

I think you are very ignorant about what goes on in comprehensive schools, it sounds like a load of ancient second hand self justifications,

of course selective schools send more students to oxbridge, but someone of the same ability has exactly the same chance of being accepted from a comprehensive school

If they want to.

You consider RG universities to be second best? Again a snobby and ignorant comment. it depends entirely on the subject, the student, and the degree. Sometimes they are the best, sometimes they are the fourth choice, last choice, or of no interest at all.

Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 02:22:05

There is absolutly nothing that Rugby can offer that I would consider desirable for my DC, and the attitudes of people like the head, and you, would be a very good reason to want to keep them well away. i would hate them to be exposed to this sort of ignorance and snobbiness.

spanisharmada Thu 24-Sep-15 02:39:05

Good for you Charis should anyone eve offer your DC a scholarship, you make sure you do that then.
Unfortunately, I don't thing many people are going to give a shiny shit what you think about it otherwise.

Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 06:16:47

Explain then, Spanisharmada, why does that headmaster think his school is so uch better than the school the boy comes from? What is "life changing" about going there? What "transformative effect" is there on a community on having a boy go there?

He just sounds like his head is stuck up his arse.

spanisharmada Thu 24-Sep-15 07:08:50

Charis why don't you ask him ? Write him an email, do it today!

MrsFrankieheck Thu 24-Sep-15 07:13:35

Rugby school is excellent, only a fool would think otherwise.

Olivepip59 Thu 24-Sep-15 07:14:12

He just sounds like his head is stuck up his arse

Such gorgeous irony.

MackerelOfFact Thu 24-Sep-15 07:19:59

I think the folk at the Standard were just flicking through their press releases and picked this one up because it contained the word 'rugby' and they could tenuously link it to the World Cup.

I read it last night and was cringing at the way they were trying to shoehorn the fact that he could now play rugby on the field where it was invented, despite him saying he'd never played rugby and prefers football! grin

AuntieStella Thu 24-Sep-15 07:24:38

The family and the sixth former himself will have had the chance to look at both his current and his future school and decide which is the best fit.

If there were no difference between schools, no-one in their right mind would be shelling out for fees, or changing schools and leaving friends for their all-too-short sixth form.

And although it's 7% at private schools overall, that's the headline, and the proportion in prep schools is much lower, and in sixth forms much higher (I've seen it put as high as 20%). The disproportion is still there though. And suggests, to me at least, that there is indeed something going on which is not happening elsewhere.

And it's OK to want it for your DC, or for sixth-formers to choose it for themselves.

And of course those Arnold scholarships have been around for (literal) centuries. I think it would be very wrong to stop offering them.

diggerdigsdogs Thu 24-Sep-15 07:51:07

If there were no difference between schools, no-one in their right mind would be shelling out for fees, or changing schools and leaving friends for their all-too-short sixth form.

This.

Charis2 Thu 24-Sep-15 07:52:05

Charis why don't you ask him ? Write him an email, do it today!

I have done so.

And of course those Arnold scholarships have been around for (literal) centuries. I think it would be very wrong to stop offering them.

The Arnold foundation was set up in 2003, according to the article

Tanith Fri 25-Sep-15 00:46:43

Charis, you are very ignorant if you believe that the children at Public schools are all snobs, or even all rich.
You are naive to the point of self-delusion if you really think that any state school can offer the same education and opportunities.

TheNewStatesman Fri 25-Sep-15 03:37:00

OP, I went to an unselective comprehensive school in South Yorkshire and got to Cambridge. Even I think you are unreasonable and sound almost ridiculously defensive.

Comprehensive schools vary a lot, but generally speaking the curriculum is going to be less stretching than at a top public school, there will probably be more disruptive behavior and time wasting, there will be fewer outstandingly good teachers, expectations in terms of homework and academic achievement will be lower.

I had some fantastic teachers at my school; I also had some awful ones, and a lot of lessons wasted due to appalling behavior by the same 3 or 4 people again and again and again. For quite a few subjects, I ended up getting good results in spite of the classes, not because of them. I have no doubt that I would have done better still (and enjoyed school more) in a top-level private school if one had been an option.

AuntieStella Fri 25-Sep-15 07:24:26

Sorry, I meant that Rugby school has been offering scholarships for centuries, including large ones.

New endowments, or updated and re-launched schemes, frequently happen in many schools.

VikingVolva Fri 25-Sep-15 07:31:14

"What "lifechanging" opportunities does he expect he can offer, which Hassenbrook acadamy can't?"

Umm, a sixth form?

Hassenbrook school doesn't actually have one. it does seem to 'feed' a local free-standing one (as do other state schools in the area).

But any pupil from there would be changing to a new school or college if they want the opportunity to take A levels.

I think we get your dislike for the choice this pupil made, OP.

Mumoftwoyoungkids Fri 25-Sep-15 07:38:05

It is a bit "look at us taking this poor lad from a terrible background who has no hope and putting him in this wonderful place". And rather patronising.

Ummm - his mum is a maths teacher! He's hardly living in terrible poverty with parents who do not understand the education system and will be unable to help guide him through the UCAS process.

I went to an Oxbridge college that was nearly all state school. Guess what the most common parent job was? Yep - a teacher. Funny that! grin

Also the people who do the Oxbridge interviews are vaguely intelligent and will know that some students have had much more help than others.

Still - the lad looks happy and that's all that matters.

hackmum Fri 25-Sep-15 09:34:18

It seems to me the school will benefit more than the boy. He will boost their results and then they can boast about how great their results are.

SevenSeconds Fri 25-Sep-15 13:02:02

I attended a private school on a 100% scholarship. I definitely believe was given opportunities that I would not have had at the local comp.

Charis2 Sat 26-Sep-15 00:10:16

Comprehensive schools vary a lot, but generally speaking the curriculum is going to be less stretching than at a top public school, there will probably be more disruptive behavior and time wasting, there will be fewer outstandingly good teachers, expectations in terms of homework and academic achievement will be lower.

What a load of rubbish, what exactly in the curriculum of a top public school is more stretching than that of a comprehensive?

What on earth makes you think rich children are better behaved?

Charis2 Sat 26-Sep-15 00:12:27

Charis, you are very ignorant if you believe that the children at Public schools are all snobs,

I never said they were. Many of them are, that is beside the point

You are naive to the point of self-delusion if you really think that any state school can offer the same education and opportunities.

Name one opportunity available at Rugby, not available at a typical comprehensive

Charis2 Sat 26-Sep-15 00:13:11

I attended a private school on a 100% scholarship. I definitely believe was given opportunities that I would not have had at the local comp.

Name one

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