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How old are your kids and what chores do they do?

(19 Posts)
Flum Mon 21-Jul-08 23:27:46

Do they get anything for that eg telly time, treats, pocket money.

My eldest dd is 4yrs and 5 months and she:

lays the table with cutlery
helps with dishwasher emptying sometimes
sometimes makes her bed, when nagged

she also puts her own clothes in laundry and shoes away etc, often has to be reminded, don't coutn that as chores though

Other than that nothing.

Have promised her pocket money when she is 5 in February and thinking of making pocket money depend on a few useful jobs around house. What do you think

stofstg Mon 21-Jul-08 23:40:44

My kids 9 an 7. They get pocket money for keeping their rooms but when they really naughty i make them clean the bathroom or kitchen. With your one at 5 though i'd say general hoovering and the dishes.

stofstg Mon 21-Jul-08 23:41:50

My kids 9 an 7. They get pocket money for keeping their rooms but when they really naughty i make them clean the bathroom or kitchen. With your one at 5 though i'd say general hoovering and the dishes.

seeker Tue 22-Jul-08 00:06:42

I think pocket money shouldn't be linked to chores. Chores need to be done - we live in a family community and we all help with the necessary jobs. They should do their share, without expecting to be paid for it. Pocket money is money children need to get the stuff they need. They should be given some money as soon as they are old enough to need it. 2 completely different things. HOWEVER - I do think it's OK to give extra money for extra jobs. Mine dust, tidy their rooms, lay the table, clear the table, wash up, sort the laundry and cook as far as they are able as part of their contribution to the family upkeep. But they get paid extra for washing the car, mowing the lawn...that sort of thing.

Flum Tue 22-Jul-08 00:08:58

Mmmm this is quite parallelt othe 'pay for dole' thread.

If they don't do anything nad just get a handout, its like starting them off on benefits isn't it.

we used to get paid for car washng and lawn mowing too.

FAQ Tue 22-Jul-08 00:10:59

DS1 (nearly 8) : Pairs all the socks up, unloads the dishwasher (and loads it sometimes too), helps hang clothes to dry (inside), takes stuff off the line (outside), makes his own bed (and strips it when it's wet), puts his clothes away/in laundry, shoes away etc, generaly tidying up, makes his own packed lunch and breakfast in the morning (and at weekends usually wants to make his own lunch too)

DS2 (4 1/2yrs) - switches the washing machine on for me (and sets it going), helps empty dishwasher, puts his clothes in the wash, dusts,

DS3 (14 months) rips up all the junk mail/other post I want to throw out wink

None of them get pocket money.

EustaciaVye Tue 22-Jul-08 18:07:58

DD1 (4.4) :
- tidies all of the toys up at the end of the day and puts them in their correct boxes.
- also picks her own clothes and dresses herself. Not a chore as such but very helpful to me.
- She collects the post and puts it on the stairs.
- She keeps an eye on DD2 for me.
- Sometimes helps unload dishwasher.
- Often runs upstairs for me if I have forgotten something grin

I am planning to start her putting her clothes in the washing basket and laying the table.

DD2 (19 months) helps me put my tea bag in my cup when making a brew grin

EustaciaVye Tue 22-Jul-08 18:08:50

Neither get pocket money. I will probably start then when she starts school though as an added incentive to do things on time, and so she can keep up with friends toys etc by earning the money to buy them.

OverMyDeadBody Tue 22-Jul-08 18:14:04

DS is 5 and generally just takes part in whatever chores need doing each day. Among other things, he can:

accurately sort washing into dark and light loads

put a load of washing on correctly, including washing powder and fabric softener

fold and put away clothes that have dried on the clothes horse

hoover

clean the mirrors

lay the table and clear the table

tidy toys away

Sweeps

dusts

Generally does anything if I give him clear instructions and ask him to, so lots of little errands throughout the day.

I wouldn't link chores with pocket money. I'd rather he just develops a sense of responsibility and pride in his home and that household tasks need to be done, for their sake, rather than for the sake of getting payed.

Besides, he needs to work for his keep wink

zaphod Tue 22-Jul-08 18:22:50

The eldest 3 each do a room a day, and swap the next day. That includes kitchen, hall, sitting room. On weekends someone has the kitchen for 2 days, and are expected to clean cooker too.

This only applies during holiday time except the kitchen weekend, because of cubs, music, homework and practice.

They take it in turns to do the dishwasher.
Ds1 mows the lawn for 7.50Euro a time.

I don't really give them pocket money, but money as they need/want it, if I think it's appropriate.

MrsTiddles Wed 23-Jul-08 18:37:49

my nearly 2 yr old puts his baby sisters nappies in the bin

he puts things away, like scattered toys and books (with prompting)

and he "helps" unload the dishwasher. Precarious but effective.

No rewards other than the pleasure on his face for doing it. I'm sure will wear off, FAST

mazzystar Wed 23-Jul-08 18:42:07

both mine chip in as much as they can at nearly four and 18 mos
much depends on their mood, but both generally quite keen
i am keen not to incentivise helping out and just make it part of normal life
i did beggar all when i was a kid [until early teens when got really into cooking and did so for whole family fairly regularly] so will be hoping for a different scenario in our house

twoplusone Mon 28-Jul-08 22:01:36

OMG.. I think my kids have it far too easy!!!

No wonder my house is always upside down, I do everything... my dd (who is nearly 12.. puts the boys (who are 4yrs and 12 months) toys away most evenings for me. But that is it. she occasionaly puts the cutlery on the table. As I am on my own alot of the time I think I need to start givinghermore chores but i feel guilty, as she does watch the boys for me whilst i runr round like alunatic, cookiking, trying to clean, tidy, wash, sort clothes out, put them away, iron..etc.etc

Are you all extremly house proud, I used to be, but the more children I have the more lax I become, when really I should be becoming more maticulas (sp!) about things.. but i really dont have the energy.. Think I may be looking into this section more often.. as I really need to buck my ideas up and take pride in my house again!!! And get the children to do the same.. when i get some energy that is..

DoubleBluff Mon 28-Jul-08 22:06:25

Gosh mine do nothing, maybe i should crack the whip!

cheesesarnie Mon 28-Jul-08 22:11:53

dd 8 and ds1 7 do daily-
making lunch boxes in term time
emptyng dishwasher
feeding rabbit
tidying bedroom
tidying floor of front room
putting away there washing
make beds.
and sweep the floor occasionally

dd also does alot more besides(she loves helpinghmm)like unpegging washing from line,folding up clothes,just generally being helpful

ds2 2 and half
makes bed and picks up toys.

at the moment mine are saving for holiday spending money so get 20 pence per job.dd sems to do bit better than ds1 he needs lots of reminding!but he can see at end of day that it pays to do his chores.

cheesesarnie Mon 28-Jul-08 22:12:46

twoplusone- im far from house proud,its just that it really is nice and helpful to have a hand.

hugeheadofhair Mon 28-Jul-08 22:13:18

My 6 and 8 year old take turns in clearing the table / filling the dishwasher. And they sort the recycling into the correct boxes outside. General tidying up. Feed the chickens and collect eggs. Certainly no pocket money for chores.

twoplusone Mon 28-Jul-08 22:14:28

DD does make her own lunch box and make breakfast for herself and ds1 whilst i do ds2.. She will also get ds1 clothes for him to put on.. as he will dress himself.. i suppose she does help me a lot in little ways, just not housework chores.. her new thing is she is allergic to washing up liquid!!!!!! mmmmmmmmm

cheesesarnie Mon 28-Jul-08 22:17:31

me too twoplusone!me too!grin

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