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Log burners

(58 Posts)
probablynotthesame Sat 13-Jan-18 17:08:55

I’m looking for your tips on how you clean the glass on your log burner.
I have a scratch pad thingy that’s specially for the glass of a log burner but apart from that and a lot of elbow grease I have no idea how to clean it!
So any fast fix/easy cleaning tips greatly appreciated.
Thanks smile

ChristianDadOnline Sat 13-Jan-18 17:10:01

Newspaper and spit - sounds disgusting but really works

BusterGonad Sat 13-Jan-18 17:10:16

I thought you could use oven cleaner on the glass. Don't quote me though.

BusterGonad Sat 13-Jan-18 17:11:16

My friend swears by newspaper with The with the dust from inside on it.

extinctspecies Sat 13-Jan-18 17:14:04

We do it the way Buster suggests - crumpled up damp newspaper with ash on it.

PissedOffNeighbour Sat 13-Jan-18 17:14:11

White wine vinegar and kitchen roll. If you burn at a high enough temperature the glass should be clean though.

TheMoreItSnows Sat 13-Jan-18 17:14:18

Hotspot glass cleaner

probablynotthesame Sat 13-Jan-18 18:38:32

Lovey thank you for your suggestions. As you can tell I’m a newbie! I will certainly try newspaper and spit grin

ToothTrauma Sat 13-Jan-18 18:46:02

Sainsbury’s apple cleaning wipe dipped in the ash. Works a treat. Buff with a bit of plain dry kitchen paper after.

Mermaidinthesea123 Sat 13-Jan-18 18:48:28

I have two and use oven cleaner, it gets the dirt off without any trouble at all.

LEMtheoriginal Sat 13-Jan-18 18:49:53

Ours tends to self clean - never cleaned it

wonderfullyweird Sat 13-Jan-18 18:51:26

This is so so easy. Just wipes away the black.

HG Stove Glass Cleaner - A foam stove window cleaner for the easy removal of soot, grease and tar https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000IU3WCA/ref=cmsww_rcpp_api_auLwAbMJMMEXN

Nemesia Sat 13-Jan-18 18:52:28

Our chimney cleaner has just been and used ash and a damp cloth. The glass has never been cleaner and has stayed clean for a week!

SueSueDonahue Sat 13-Jan-18 18:52:59

Just get it really hot and it self cleans.

I rarely clean mine. Maybe once in the summer. And it's looking pretty clean this evening.

Furball Sat 13-Jan-18 19:16:10

I use bar keepers friend on ours

probablynotthesame Sat 13-Jan-18 19:19:55

Thank you for all your suggestions, it puts me off using it when I know I have to clean it but it makes the living room so cosy! It’s only a small one I’m not really sure how to get it ‘really hot’?

Cataline Sat 13-Jan-18 19:24:12

What are you burning in it?
With the right fuel and the right fire, the glass shouldn't really be getting dirty that often.

Todamhottoday Sat 13-Jan-18 19:27:09

Crumpled paper, bit water/spit and rub in ash, clean then buff with newspaper, should bring the soot/tar marks off that are usually amber in colour, depending on what your burning, done this for 10+ years, does not take long at all.

Once every couple weeks a scrub with a cloth with bar keepers friend when I take everything out for a good clean and vacuum the ropes around the window and check the back/side bricks

Willowfrost Sat 13-Jan-18 19:27:57

Another vote here for damp newspaper and ash.

LadesC Sat 13-Jan-18 19:28:56

Damp cloth dipped in the ash from the bottom.of the burner. Works amazingly.

LizzieSiddal Sat 13-Jan-18 19:28:58

We just use damp kitchen roll. You don’t need to use spit! Just a bit of water.

SueSueDonahue Sat 13-Jan-18 19:32:13

@probablynotthesame a small one is trickier, and not as efficient. What I'd do is after an extended period of time with it burning, add several heat logs and close the vents once they take. It'll ramp up the heat!

Or carry on cleaning it ☺️

probablynotthesame Sat 13-Jan-18 19:38:20

@Cataline I’m using cardboard bit of newspaper and some kindling to get it started then add a log and let it catch.
It’s very much trial and error, whenever I start it it dies pretty quickly I had to get my Mum over to get it started tonight blush
She has large log burners that seem to self clean as pp have said

NotEnoughCats Sat 13-Jan-18 19:46:15

It shouldn't really need cleaning very often, kitchen roll and water should be enough to get any ash off. It sounds like you are burning wood which isn't properly seasoned (dried) so there is tar on the inside of the wood burner glass. This will also be building up in the flue, which can cause a fire if it ignites. If you are using green wood (i.e. wood that isn't sufficiently dry) it stops the fire from getting hot, which condenses water in the flue/fireplace and leads to the build up of tar. You need to use seasoned wood which has been air dried for at least a year, or which is kiln dried.

You also need to get the fire hot by allowing more oxygen into it. A fire needs oxygen, so when you first build the fire, build a kind of long criss-crossed stack of kindling, maybe three layers high, with plenty of space between the kindling for oxygen to get round, and open the damper. Add a couple of small logs on the top, and then light it at the bottom (I use a firestarter block). It should all light pretty quickly. The stack of kindling/smaller logs should collapse into a heap of glowing coals, then you can add a couple of bigger logs. Once they have started to burn, close the damper to reduce the oxygen slightly, which will slow the rate that the logs burn at so that they last longer.

This should prevent the build up of tar on the glass and burn off any that is there, so you can just clean it over with water and kitchen roll to clean the ash off.

NotEnoughCats Sat 13-Jan-18 19:48:26

Only close the damper slightly though once it is going. If you close it too much it will go out.

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