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Boiler - timer, thermostat.... Help?!?!

(10 Posts)
sparkle9 Thu 03-Jan-13 20:55:01

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Chewbecca Thu 03-Jan-13 21:05:42

On morning 6-8 and afternoon 3-10. Temperature is set at 22.
If it's very cold and I am home during the day I switch it on again by lunchtime but only to 20.5 in the daytime.
16 must be freezing!
Insulated/new build or not, not sure why that would affect the temperature you're telling the house to get to, only the effort (and therefore cost) the system has to make to get to that temp?

MushroomSoup Sat 05-Jan-13 15:03:35

Same here. 4 bed house although old and draughty! Thermostat set to 22.

PigletJohn Sat 05-Jan-13 23:49:46

set the timer to come on half an hour before you get up, and half an hour before you come home (if you are at home all day leave the timer on all day) and to go off half an hour before you go to bed.

I would use about 18C. for the room stat. You will feel warmer during the day especially if the sun is out but will feel colder after dark.

If you are sensitive to cold and would rather burn money that put a vest on, you can turn it up to 20 or 22, but will get acclimatised and feel the cold even more.

It sounds like you have a hot water cylinder in the airing cupboard. What colour is it?

Are you willing to go in the loft?

sparkle9 Sun 06-Jan-13 13:29:17

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

RaspberryLemonPavlova Sun 06-Jan-13 13:40:08

Ours is switched on all the time with a programmable timer. This is set to 18C from 6-8 am and 3.30 to 9 pm. During the day its set to 16C and at nighttime is 7C (basically doesn't come on).

All the radiators have individual thermostats too.

I'm usually in during the day and unless its very, very cold this is fine.

Twenty year old 4 bedded house.

ilovepowerhoop Sun 06-Jan-13 13:49:14

mine comes on twice a day 6-10am and 5-10pm and is off overnight. Thermostat set between 18 and 20°C. I find it cold when the house temperature drops below 18 so 16 degrees would be freezing for me.

PigletJohn Sun 06-Jan-13 13:49:53

A white cylinder is most often a pressurised unvented one such as a Megaflo, that delivers hot water at mains pressure, for a powerful shower.

The red thing is most likely a pressure vessel to take up expansion when the water is heated

The small white thing might be an additional pressure vessel if one was faulty or not big enough. You need one for the cylinder and one for the boiler. There is most often one inside the boiler but you can have an external one if necessary

It sounds like you have a modern high-quality system. The boiler will heat the cylinder in about 20 minutes, it will be well-insulated in the factory. It can be useful to set the HW timer to come on half an hour before the CH, the cylinder will not lose any significant heat in that time. You can insulate the hot pipes with Climaflex or similar, but there shouldn't be much else that needs doing. If the cylinder is 220 litres, that's enough for about 2 baths so you do only need to heat it for half an hour or so twice a day, including before and after baths and showers, that will let the boiler run more economically as it will not keep running for short periods to top up. If you run out of water during the day you can extend the timing.

gobbin Sun 06-Jan-13 21:50:32

Agree that 16deg is cold. Ours is set to 20 deg.

Eeeeeowwwfftz Sun 06-Jan-13 22:03:26

It's a bit pointless paying too much attention to the actual number that's written on the thermostat since it's often the case that it's been deliberately positioned in a cooler part of the house and it's probably not that accurate anyway. And then if it's a windy or wet day you may find the house cools down quicker than on still, dry days so you might need a higher setting to achieve the same level of comfort. So its mostly a case of trial and error. That said the kinds of patterns described here (couple of hours in the morning, blast from mid-afternoon to bedtime) sounds pretty normal.

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