Help should I do a degree?!?

(4 Posts)
April8888 Thu 07-Jul-16 08:04:43

Hey all, I'm new to mumsnet but thought Id get an outsiders point of view. I'm seriously considering studying to be a nurse. I have two children 3yr old and a nearly one year old and I'm 34!! My sister and two best friends are full of encouragment but my DP seems doubtful. I work part time at the moment only two nights a week and I havent done anything study like since school and I wasn't that keen then. I really feel I should further myself for my babies. But he seems to be putting me off with comments like 'it's a big thing, do you really want to do that though?' I was thinking of a teaching assitant and he seemed alright with that, maybe because this involves a degree he might think I can't do it. Help I'm stuck, I don't want to start it and not finish it but then owe money on fees!

Dayna1 Thu 07-Jul-16 08:11:59

First of all, be 100% sure in it if you decide to do.
I have a cousin with a 9 year old daughter, she works and decided to study to be a nurse as well.
She works in a nurse home for many years and now she's been raised to a higher position.
It is a great motivation. So decide what you want to do with this degree and keep it as a goal to keep working on it even when it is hard.
Just do it.

titchy Thu 07-Jul-16 09:14:56

You'll need to do an Access course and get relevant work experience first. Once you've got both those you should have a better idea of whether a nursing degree is for you. You'll also need Maths and English GCSE grade C or above so if you don't have those get yourself to college!

Lj8893 Thu 07-Jul-16 09:18:52

Absolutley you should go for it if you really want it, it is hard work though.

You will need to do an access course first, and get English and maths GCSEs if you haven't already got them. And some relevant work experience is always helpful for your application.

Also, just in case it was the NHS bursary swaying you towards nursing, from sept 2017 all future nursing students will have to get a student loan to pay for thier training and living costs which will be repayable once you start earning over £21000 a year.

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