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Choosing an "Applied" subject

(3 Posts)
eatyourveg Mon 17-Nov-14 15:53:22

ds3 is in the process of filtering down courses and of the what is now 17, one of them has applied in the title - looking at the modules it doesn't seem very different from many of the other courses he has looked at with the same name albeit without the applied bit.

Do applied courses hold less kudos than non-applied? Are they akin to a "studies" subject? Eg French versus French Studies would to me indicate that the latter is not as rigorous or at least has a wider focus. I see ucas has courses in applied maths, applied science, applied computing, applied marine biology, applied psychology, applied sports science, applied social work as well as others. Some of these are at very respectable institutions which made me think perhaps applied courses are held in equal esteem?

I had thought it meant one was more hands-on but not sure how applied maths can be more hands on than straight forward maths and if its not, then why bother calling it applied? (Not that he's looking at Maths)

JeanneDeMontbaston Mon 17-Nov-14 16:15:55

I think it depends on the subject.

Applied maths simply means 'not pure maths' (as in, mechanics, statistics etc.). It is closer to physics and has clear real-world applications. Pure maths is not more or less rigorous, but doesn't usually have an immediate and obvious relationship to the real world. I don't understand his research but IIRC, bits of it involve discussing points in n-dimensional space (ie., really really really not the real world). OTOH if you do mechanics, you're looking at describing the real world.

I don't think it's comparable to 'applied psychology', though I'd be lying if I said I knew what that was. Applied maths as a term for a type of maths has been around for donkey's years.

Some 'studies' courses are fine.

JeanneDeMontbaston Mon 17-Nov-14 16:17:25

Huh, what happened to my post. confused

Sorry. I meant to post that DB is a pure mathematician and his research is non-real-world stuff.

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