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Please share ideas for the kind of part-time work a bright but not-qualified-for-anything-in-particular mum could do

(12 Posts)
appleoverload Mon 22-Sep-08 16:04:43

I have a design degree, though am not specifically qualified for a particular kind of design work. I have done quite a lot of charity work, pre-DS, including fundraising and copy-writing and design work - but again, am not specifically qualified nor highly trained in these fields.

Despite storming through school, I never got a "career" off the ground as such. Now, I have been out of the work loop for four-and-a-half years, and unexpectedly need to return to work very soon - so no time for retraining first.

I have a ton of hobbies, and really would love to do all kinds of odd bits to earn a living, but that probably isn't viable.

I'd love to hear any ideas at all for what kind of work I could possibly do mornings only, or up to three days a week.

Ideally, I need to earn upwards of £12,000.

Thanks.

morningpaper Mon 22-Sep-08 16:08:26

I would get an admin job at a charity, and then get involved with perhaps some fundraising or designing leaflets etc to show off your skills. Then you could move into perhaps a Fundraising assistant type role (you could perhaps apply for these with your current experience), which could lead to Fundraising opportunities. Fundraisers need design skills IME.

If you get no-where with this, what about asking your local CVS (volunteer bureau) if there are any charities that need board members or similar?

captainmummy Mon 22-Sep-08 16:09:28

Me too! I've been out of work for 15 years (SAHM) other than dinner-lady, school volunteering etc. I used to work in computing, but my skils are out-of-the-ark now (I was pre-internet!!).

Couple of days a week, couple of hours a day. Not bothered about the earnings, it's as much to get me out of the house and meeting new people.grin

WilfSell Mon 22-Sep-08 16:13:23

Where do you live? Near a big town/city?

Hundred of organisations could use your skills, especiall public sector ones. You should look for a flexible post which has opportunities for career development and training perhaps.

I work in a university: universities are always looking for administrative staff with general admin skills and your 'extras' could be an added bonus (for example on a research project or in an academic dept). The advantage of this kind of public sector organisation is there is usually good career advancement, conditions (eg pension and childcare and flexibility arrangements etc) and opportunities to move into different areas if you're keen enough.

Good luck.

appleoverload Mon 22-Sep-08 16:16:38

Thanks, morningpaper.

I could apply for a fundraising assistant kind of role - I used to be a trust fundraiser - it's just that there are no such posts available locally, and when there are, they are always full-time. A part-time trust fundraising post would be do-able.

I found that design skills were key to putting together a good application - that's how my role evolved into design and print coordinator for the charity. I find the inevitable rejection of fundraising a bit hard to stomach after a while, so something more in the design camp would be great. I'm pretty arty and creative.

Appreciate your thoughts.

captain - good luck with your job hunt. I do need the earnings to hit a certain level. It's getting that elusive part-time post that's tricky. If earnings aren't crucial, would volunteering work for you? My experience of charities is that that always need dedicated volunteers. There are some potentially very rewarding opportunities out there.

appleoverload Mon 22-Sep-08 16:18:26

Thanks, Wilf. I live in a market town, and to fit around DS's school arrangements, local would be better - which of course restricts opportunities.

Some great suggestions in your post, though: we do have a handful of charities, a big college, etc. Ta.

Snowybird Thu 25-Sep-08 22:18:32

I am job-hunting too and have been told that employers are really only interested in what you have done for the past five years.
That's if you apply cold.
However, if you can use some personal connection, or even the fact of local residence in your market town, employers are more likely to take a broader view.
I was talking to London headhunters who weren't trying very hard, then I decided to go to the local high street employment agency just to see what would happen.
They are amazing. Two recruiters immediately spent the entire day on the phone calling 25 local employers. The local connection does seem to be much more promising.
Local employers understand why you, as a parent, want a local job.
Hope this helps

Snowybird Thu 25-Sep-08 22:18:50

I am job-hunting too and have been told that employers are really only interested in what you have done for the past five years.
That's if you apply cold.
However, if you can use some personal connection, or even the fact of local residence in your market town, employers are more likely to take a broader view.
I was talking to London headhunters who weren't trying very hard, then I decided to go to the local high street employment agency just to see what would happen.
They are amazing. Two recruiters immediately spent the entire day on the phone calling 25 local employers. The local connection does seem to be much more promising.
Local employers understand why you, as a parent, want a local job.
Hope this helps

ChelleQ Fri 26-Sep-08 08:55:31

I posted my cv on Monster.co.uk, admittedly I have worked in the last year which helps, but I agree with Snowybird, local agencies are good, if you can cope with a regular change of jobs and the income isn't so important then doing a few temp jobs is a good way to get experience.

Angela1982 Fri 26-Sep-08 17:34:49

What about working from home?? I currently work for Usborne Books At Home which I find is perfect for me as it is something I can do around my 2 year old DD. She comes with me to daytime events which she loves and solves child care issues.

If you are interested email me at angelamawer@hotmail.com

littlelapin Fri 26-Sep-08 17:39:16

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

LittleWeePickle Mon 06-Oct-08 16:18:45

I have a Fine Art degree, and was a graphic designer, but after having had DS I was told that I would not be considered for a job as I have been on maternity leave and have not worked for a year!

There are very few creative jobs where I live (moved here 18 months ago) and I feel despondent...

Is college the only reasonable option for me to refresh my rusty (almost gone...) skills?

Are there such things as "Back to Work" schemes for wannabe working mums?

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