PhD, job and DC plans

(15 Posts)
PixieChemist Sun 10-Sep-17 09:46:47

Thanks to the rest of you for clarifying what I meant as obviously it was not clear to Copper.

What she's not sure of is whether a PhD or industry experience will put her in a better position when she goes back to work.

This ^^ is spot on and what I was trying to get at.

I want to go back to industry (chemical industry fwiw) and I'd love to do a PhD but if it would hinder my career then it seems selfish of me to go for it. In terms of having DC during it there seems to be a complete divide of opinion. There never seems to be a middle ground but two camps of yes definitely go for it or no way that's not going to work.

OP’s posts: |
PixieChemist Sun 10-Sep-17 09:42:52

copper I really don't understand where you've got the idea from that I don't want DC or I only want them to fulfil societal expectations? Lots of people consider the impact on career. DC are not going to be home forever or need me around 24/7 forever. I can assure you any child of ours would be 100% wanted and 100% loved.

I'm sorry you feel planning for mine and their futures is a bad thing hmm

OP’s posts: |
bringmelaughter Sun 10-Sep-17 07:48:01

But nothing the OP says suggests she doesn't want children. She is planning a career around her children, that suggests she wants children.

Your post suggests that if a mother wants to plan her career then she doesn't want children. Society wouldn't get far if every parent (mother and father) took the stance that they shouldn't contemplate how to fit children around work. No working parents, that's going to work.

ReallyConvolutedCareerHistory Sun 10-Sep-17 07:46:35

If she is not sure, then she probably doesn't really want them.

OP said she would like to have kids, even take time out to be with the kids in the earlier years.

What she's not sure of is whether a PhD or industry experience will put her in a better position when she goes back to work.

MaisyPops Sun 10-Sep-17 07:41:21

copper
DH and I have been TTC for a year and have considered the impact on my career. Unfortunately, women need to consider the effect of time out on their careeer as the world penalises women (particularly in more.competitive careers) who have children. There is a motherhood penalty and a fatherhood bonus because men with kids get viewed very positively.

OP, if you want a PhD for personal satisfaction then maybe do it now because it'll be easier without kids. If you're not fussed either way, maybe take the work experience.

Copperbeech33 Sun 10-Sep-17 07:38:39

That's right Copperbeech33. Any mum thinking about work or things not related to their offspring are neglectful poor parents. I'm sure you're saying exactly the same about all the working dads out there.

what's the attitude for, the OP wanted opinions as to what her plans should be, I merely said that having children because it is a socially expected norm is not a good thing. Children should be wanted. If she is not sure, then she probably doesn't really want them.

bringmelaughter Sun 10-Sep-17 07:34:30

That's right Copperbeech33. Any mum thinking about work or things not related to their offspring are neglectful poor parents. I'm sure you're saying exactly the same about all the working dads out there.

Advertisement

ReallyConvolutedCareerHistory Sun 10-Sep-17 07:02:47

I think it's normal to worry about employability after raising children, especially for the OP who, I am assuming, is a high-achiever - at least high-achieving enough to have the option to do a PhD.

Radliay Sun 10-Sep-17 06:51:55

Depends which industry but almost certainly industry experience.

flumpybear Sun 10-Sep-17 06:47:29

If you do a PhD you would struggle to put it on hold for a few years for a family, if either do it and plan your first baby around finishing time of PhD or do PhD later - you could always get a role in a university and ask if you can do a PhD alongside

Copperbeech33 Sun 10-Sep-17 06:46:34

Thats fine, but then she went on to ask whether having a gap was a bad thing for her employment history. If she really wants children, this would be the least of her concerns!

ReallyConvolutedCareerHistory Sun 10-Sep-17 06:43:30

Copperbeech33

But she said "DP and I would like to have DC in the next few years (or try at least!) and in an ideal world I'd like to take some time out to be with them in their early years. "

Copperbeech33 Sun 10-Sep-17 06:42:11

If you want children, then this is your priority, and everything else takes second place. It doesn't sound like you particularly want a family, in which case you shouldn't have one. Nothing worse than a child growing up unwanted.

ReallyConvolutedCareerHistory Sun 10-Sep-17 06:28:23

I think it depends on what kind of job you would like to shoot for in the future?

If academia, then handsdown, PhD. If industry, unless the position calls for PhDs (like maybe a research scientist), industry experience will hold more weight.

PixieChemist Thu 07-Sep-17 09:01:30

I'm not sure if this is the right place for this but it's related to going back to work so here goes...

I'm thinking of doing a PhD and considering the impact this will have on other plans. DP and I would like to have DC in the next few years (or try at least!) and in an ideal world I'd like to take some time out to be with them in their early years. So I'm wondering, as an employer what looks better; having a years industrial experience plus a PhD behind me, or having 5 years industrial experience? Either way there would be a gap in my employment / study history after these things but I'm just not sure which would put me in a better position. What do you think is better in your experience/ opinion?

OP’s posts: |

Join the discussion

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.

Join Mumsnet

Already have a Mumsnet account? Log in