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Working out my salary

(11 Posts)
dancelikenoneiswatching Tue 28-Mar-17 15:55:30

I am after a little bit of advice.

If a job is advertised as 19,000-25,000 what can I typically expect to be paid?
TIAsmile

LillyLollyLandy Tue 28-Mar-17 15:56:39

Do you mean after tax or within that range?

LIZS Tue 28-Mar-17 15:58:20

Gross Salary would usually be offered according to experience, with increments for service or extra responsibility.

Bitchycocktailwaitress Tue 28-Mar-17 15:59:58

Do you mean after tax? That's £1,341 take home on £19K PA assuming no student loans.

If you mean what range will you end up in, that depends on your experience relative to other candidates or your negotiation skills.

dancelikenoneiswatching Tue 28-Mar-17 16:07:31

Thanks for replies.
It is before tax/ni just seems such a difference in what I could be paid. I wasn't sure if it would be performance related or dependant on qualifications perhaps it is that reason. smile

Theresnonamesleft Tue 28-Mar-17 16:15:43

This is a nifty little calculator that I use
listentotaxman.com/uk-tax-calculator/

afromom Tue 28-Mar-17 16:17:28

Usually you would start at the bottom of the salary range, so £19k then move up the scale each year. There is often room for negotiation though, so you can ask to start on a higher level, e.g if you are moving from a different job at a higher pay/have valuable experience or quals that other candidates may not have. The answer will often be no, but I do know of some people in my company who have successfully negotiated a higher than basic starting salary.
That would be a good question to ask at interview, e.g. 'I notice that the role works to a salary scale, could you tell me how that works?'

notangelinajolie Tue 28-Mar-17 16:23:51

I second what Theresnonamesleft said.

listentotaxman.com/uk-tax-calculator/

dancelikenoneiswatching Tue 28-Mar-17 16:32:36

Thanks for responses it is the first time the second figure has been on a job advert for this company. They usually only advertise the lower salary think they are trying to entice new staff by advertising the higher salary!

bluebelltippytoes Tue 28-Mar-17 21:17:47

In public sector, you would start at the bottom of the scale generally.

In private sector, it would generally be in the middle. Having said that, I have started at the top of the scale for a couple of jobs that I was more than qualified for.

To be honest, I never get too hopeful when there is a range as they often advertise an unrealistic upper limit to draw candidates in. I had a telephone interview for a job the other day that clearly indicated the salary in the advert (not a range). The recruiter asked me what salary I was looking for. I was a bit hmm as if I am successful they will probably try and offer less (closer to my previous salary). I will be pretty angry if they do.

OohNoDooEy Tue 28-Mar-17 21:23:09

In private sector, it's a guide. I've negotiated beyond the scale indicated beforehand. It's so much easier if you're using a recruiter as you can ask for lots more - better pension contributions, holiday allowances etc too. The first offer is just a starting point.

At interview they might ask what you're looking for. Just explain what you want but justify briefly why - I've got 2 years experience & exams so I'd be looking around the middle of the scale, as an example.

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