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Are IEPs continued from nursery to Reception?

(6 Posts)
Wakey Thu 13-Oct-11 15:58:39

My son is 4 and was identified as bright while at his nursery and given an IEP about a year ago for being at the top end of the ability scale.

It was reviewed regularly by his nursery and on his starting school in September I was told all his tracker etc would be passed onto the Reception teacher.

He has now nearly completed his first half term and while he is on a much higher level for reading than his peers the books are still far too easy and I am concerned nobody has even mentioned the IEP they made a big deal about at nursery.

Are IEPs automatically carried on to primary from a nursery setting or do they assess him themselves and ignore anything from nursery? (it was the school's nursery) I do not want to appear as a pushy parent but am also aware that he is not being challenged at all in school and am scared boredom will set in soon. Do I ask for a meeting or leave it 'til Christmas?

madwomanintheattic Thu 13-Oct-11 16:16:24

he will have been assessed and started on books at whatever level the assessing teacher saw fit.

ieps are not 'carried over' as at this age they should be re-done every term. tbh they are more than likely getting the iep's organised for children who require support at the other end of the spectrum first. some schools don't bother with iep's for more able children at all, but still manage to differentiate appropriately in the classroom.

honeslty, i wouldn't sweat it. just wait until the first parent's evening and then ask about appropriate differentiation. and take him to the library or wherever else he gets his home books in the interim. there's usually a parent's evening in the first term to discuss settling in etc.

madwomanintheattic Thu 13-Oct-11 16:19:24

(should add - dd2 was working at 12yo for reading and comprehension in yr r - they didn't bother to do an iep for the more able stuff until the new year. it didn't alter the fact that she could read.)

Wakey Thu 13-Oct-11 18:53:06

Thanks so much. When it is your first foray into education with your kids it is all SO complicated and scary! I was that freaked out when they mentioned Special Needs the first time it took me a while to come down from it and think logically. I hate the need to label when in our day we were just a bit bright! It is a tiny school with shared year groups so in theory this year should be good for him but my biggest fear is that he will tread water while the rest catch up.

Thanks for your advice.

AnxiousElephant Sun 16-Oct-11 01:03:05

TBH I worried about this when dd1 started school but with reading it is easy for them to differentiate their home books. I feel however, that often the problem lies in the group story time when often the plot of the book is very simple - boring for dd, but she seems happy so I haven't really challenged it, I just read her more exciting books before bed to stimulate her comprehension.
The more challenging aspect was her social awareness which most of her peers were not on the same wave length. Its better now because they have mixed Y1 and 2 classes and she has grown in her ability to match social games to her peers ability.
IME the things that you do at home will be more valuable.

iggly2 Sun 16-Oct-11 12:18:27

I agree with the "not to worry too much about reading as they can read what they like at home" approach. Ds does group reading and enjoys it (He can now work with someone else smile and not 1-2-1 with a teacher/TA in this as well as other subjects). I think continuation of IEPs etc depends on school with DS we have been told at the start of each year a bit about what is being done (occasionally I still feel a bit in the dark but if the child is happy I am a great believer in that's fine with me smile). I would say do not worry-though probably would myself if school were not as proactive as they are.

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