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Child G & T in science but very poor in other subjects, help!

(9 Posts)
nojustificationneeded Wed 14-Sep-11 21:29:41

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

kangers Wed 14-Sep-11 23:17:10

Explain to her that her lesser ability in those areas will hold her back in biology. Get her to write/ do mmaths linked to biology?

kangers Wed 14-Sep-11 23:17:46

And sounds like she is fine with what she is doing in biology.
Get her a pet?

Freddiecat Wed 14-Sep-11 23:21:16

I think you need to talk to her school about this. My DS is similar. The school has to ensure they are doing everything they can to help her achieve her potential.

Hopefully they will be able to put in place some strategies to help her improve her basic skills.

There are some great science based activity books for Junior school age kids out there. Try big garden centres that sell books.

nojustificationneeded Wed 14-Sep-11 23:32:42

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

nojustificationneeded Wed 14-Sep-11 23:34:22

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

gelatinous Thu 15-Sep-11 00:42:28

I think rather than focussing on forging ahead with her biological knowledge, you need to use her interest in that area to surreptitiously improve her other areas (use biological maths problems and get her to write stuff up gramatically with ever more complex sentences etc.) a bit like primary teachers use topic work to develop a whole range of skills sometimes. You need to try and narrow the gap rather than increase it.

munstersmum Thu 15-Sep-11 14:37:54

The Science Museum kits make good birthday presents. (Amazon / WHSmith or can be found sometimes reduced in TKMaxx) Make sure she has to read the instructions.

We got a free trial on mangamaths.com There are maths games but they also set them 'challenges' which are basic numeracy skills with simple explanations provided.

Merle Sat 17-Sep-11 08:32:25

We sent my son to a tutor for the 11+. At the time he was way ahead in science, and average-ish for literacy. At first the tutor let him work on his science; to get him confident with what he was good at, this seemed to have the knock-on effect of bringing him on with his written work.

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