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At what age do you know that your DC is G&T?

(79 Posts)
strandedbear Fri 03-Jun-11 16:57:57

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

belledechocchipcookie Fri 03-Jun-11 17:13:49

I didn't notice until he started school but suspected that something wasn't quite as it should be when he was 1. He was given an alphabet bus as a present for his first birthday, 2 weeks later he could read the alphabet (out of sequence), count to 10 and knew all of the basic shapes.

vegasmum Fri 03-Jun-11 17:38:07

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JoanofArgos Fri 03-Jun-11 18:02:28

At your dd's age, my dds were walking a bit and talking a bit.
They got put on the g&t register at school later because they happened to be in that percent of the class. And then I knew they were definitely g&t.

strandedbear Fri 03-Jun-11 18:19:10

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

ragged Fri 03-Jun-11 18:19:24

What do you think of as Gifted, OP? Top 10%? Top 2%? Genius-gonna-change-the-world? Amazingly clever? Top 0.01%? What?

mrsravelstein Fri 03-Jun-11 18:22:29

ds1 could do all the things your dd does at that age too. by age 6 he was bottom of the class where he has steadfastly remained ever since. so i'd say 15 months is waaaay early to be thinking about it.

BriansMum Fri 03-Jun-11 18:24:32

I would try not to think too much about it at this age if you can help it. Children ebb and flow in terms of giftedness and some studies have shown that giftedness can't truly be identified til about 11years old!

Just enjoy her smile.

pinkhebe Fri 03-Jun-11 18:24:48

and yet my ds at that age could do none of that but by the age of 4, he was beginning to show that he was quite bright. It wasn't formally told to me until cat tests in yr 4

BriansMum Fri 03-Jun-11 18:25:19

Mrsravel has just proved my point! blush

BriansMum Fri 03-Jun-11 18:25:48

And pink!

princessglitter Fri 03-Jun-11 18:28:52

Don't know if dd is gifted, but was a bit taken aback when she read her first word at 2.5! She is now 3 and reading simple stories fairly well and is also articulate (using words such as 'otherwise' in conversation) don't think you would be able to tell at 15 months.

Plus there are so many areas of development - my 18 month old ds has been using a fork confidently for months and eats soup with a spoon, can climb stairs, but doesn't talk much and will not let me read him a story! I'm not at all worried about hm though.

QuinnFabray Fri 03-Jun-11 18:34:02

I think there is a difference between a gifted child ( although where do you draw the line? How do you define gifted? ) and a child who is labelled G&T.

A G&T child is one that fits into criteria laid down by the government. Top five percent of the class, I think it is, and therefore, generally not "gifted" as such, but just brighter than average. And it ebbs and flows. My DS was G&T in year 1 and 2, and now he is in year 5, and is not. He's still the the bright lad he was, but obviously not quite performing academically in the top 5 % this year.

BriansMum Fri 03-Jun-11 18:37:12

This is where labelling G&T too early can be so damaging Quinn.

I would strongly recommend reading the book NurtureShock -v interesting stuff. I certainly suffered for being a gifted child who was constantly told how bright she was blush.

JazminKennedy Sat 04-Jun-11 00:12:30

Personally its what you do with it, when you find out you have an exceptionally 'gifted' child. My daughter was a terrible baby, didn't eat, didn't sleep, gwod knows how i didn't end up with post natal depression! shock She started walking when she was 9 months, made it worse for me coz i got pregnant straight away with my son, the girl just did not believe in crawling!! I knew she was 'special' coz of the amount of jigsaw puzzles she use to do, before she was a year old she was able to do 50/80 piece puzzles. She knew all her alphabets and could count and back from at least 20. I just initially put it down to her being fond of puzzles and numbers. It was only when she became very sick and we were seeing tons of consultants that the term 'gifted' was used. She was 14 months and did a 200 piece puzzle right in front of the doc! I still didn't use that term for her until now (she's 6). She was reading and writing at 2 and even was playing nursery rhymes on our Vtech walker (which only had 4 keys!!) That's when it hit me, that my daughter had exceptional talents. I just decided to feed her abilities with resources, books, more puzzles, she has a piano now, on which she plays Beethoven. We have been appraoched several times to enter her for the Child Genius progs but that is out of the Q for us. I just want my children to be healthy and happy and if they show interest in something, i provide the resources for them smile

JazminKennedy Sat 04-Jun-11 00:54:28

Sorry to ramble on, but i have a completely diff story with my son! He is only 14 months younger (almost 5) than my daughter but no one has ever mentioned the 'term' gifted with him, although he is exceptionally bright. (I'm his mother so i'm just biased) grin He spoke in full sentences when he was only 8 months!! I nearly dropped him when he said to me "mama, what's that?"shock But he was a late walker, started walking at 14 months! And read his first book by himself at age 4 (he regularly says he hates reading!) What makes him exceptional to me is his ability to fix things!! He loves tools and spends ages just taking apart toys and putting them back together again. He always tells us how he needs to know how certain things work and will not rest until he finds out! He also has an electronic kit, loves making circuits, light switches, bells and fans etc. I would say he was 'gifted' solely because he has a high interest in that field but others may disagree...

cubscout Sat 04-Jun-11 08:50:39

Stranded, my ds had only just started walking at 15 months, was not talking and showed no interest in feefing himself. It was not until he got to school that it became apparant he was very bright and not until Y 2 that he was identified as a 'gifted child' (gifted in the sense of IQ, top 0.1% rather than school based definition).

And, age 10, he can still barely follow instruction, or construct an intelligible sentence grin

blackeyedsusan Sat 04-Jun-11 20:05:36

strandedbear, enjoy it, revel in it but I doubt she will be labelled as gifted until well into school unless she is really exceptional..

JemimaMop Sat 04-Jun-11 20:12:04

DS2 was the latest of my 3 to do most things. He didn't walk until he was 17 months, didn't talk in sentences until he was 2. He was in nappies until he was 3. I was really disappointed when he was a toddler as he didn't seem to enjoy listening to me read books as his older brother had.

However he is the only only one of my three who has had extra help in school due to being "ahead", especially in reading/literacy. So much for not enjoying books...

He has however just turned 7 and still can't ride his bike without stabilisers. It's all relative.

cory Sun 05-Jun-11 14:46:04

I think 50 is a good age; most people will have started realising their potential by then.

rabbitstew Sun 05-Jun-11 18:54:15

A gifted child is, apparently, one whose parents tell the world how phenomenal their children are. Or one who gets a very high score in an IQ test but is otherwise neurotic, difficult to live with, miserable at school and has a limited range of practical skills likely to be of use to them, which is why they have their IQ tested in the first place. Or one who has obsessional interests that result in them becoming highly talented in one direction. Amazing it's called "gifted," really, when a more fair use of the word "gifted" would be using it to refer to children who have a positive outlook on life, are socially clever, enjoy every stage of their lives, work hard to achieve their goals, are generous and fair minded, find life interesting and enjoyable, deal well with setbacks, and are more "clever" at schoolwork than average, but not so clever that school becomes boring before they've finished. I'd love to have been gifted with all of that.

Hassled Sun 05-Jun-11 18:57:20

10, when DS2 was put on the G&T register at school. He's above averagely bright - that's the extent of it.

jetmonkey Sun 05-Jun-11 18:58:25

Quite right rabbitstew grin

activate Sun 05-Jun-11 19:03:57

not until secondary school age

children develp at different rates - if they are still astounding the teachers in their year group at age 13 then probably gifted or talented at something

At primary if they are a level 5 at year 4 then probably quite talented, if they are a grade 6 musically I'd be impressed

but what they do with it is what counts - a child who is brought up believing they have to work hard will do much better than one who thinks it's all easy - a child with interest in what they're doing who is a self-starter will probably succeed

the governmental, now thankfully fading slightly, policy of assinging 10% of children in primary per year as G&T is frankly ridiculous and a salve to those with bright children - the issue is the appalling state of UK education and they believe a couple of trips to art galleries or a couple of maths / writing clubs will appease

JazminKennedy Sun 05-Jun-11 23:02:09

rabbitstew A gifted child is, apparently, one whose parents tell the world how phenomenal their children are. Or one who gets a very high score in an IQ test but is otherwise neurotic, difficult to live with, miserable at school and has a limited range of practical skills likely to be of use to them, which is why they have their IQ tested in the first place. Or one who has obsessional interests that result in them becoming highly talented in one direction. Amazing it's called "gifted," really, when a more fair use of the word "gifted" would be using it to refer to children who have a positive outlook on life, are socially clever, enjoy every stage of their lives, work hard to achieve their goals, are generous and fair minded, find life interesting and enjoyable, deal well with setbacks, and are more "clever" at schoolwork than average, but not so clever that school becomes boring before they've finished. I'd love to have been gifted with all of that.

I completely and utterly disagree with you!! In fact i am offended by your comment, would you dare write something similar on the SEN thread? My children are NOT difficult to live with, they are NOT miserable and their skills are in no way LIMITED! Clearly you have had bad experiences but lets not generalise here! Firstly, do you have children who are 'Gifted?'

And what the hell is wrong with praising ones children? Do you not tell friends and family when your child does something amazing or even something silly??

My children are my blessing, i have comes on this thread for networking pursposes and to find out if anybody else has children like mine, what are your reasons for being here then?

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