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Can you get childrens ears syringed at the Drs?

(17 Posts)
cocolepew Tue 21-Jul-09 17:32:21

DD is 11 and has a lot of impacted wax in her ears, I've tried the drops and it's not shifting, is she old enough to get them syringed?
Thanks.

cocolepew Tue 21-Jul-09 18:05:06

Hellooooooooooooooooooo

emma1977 Tue 21-Jul-09 21:10:42

Our surgery wouldn't do it.

No need to do anything about it unless hearing is affected. In that case, we refer to ENT specialists.

FluffyBunnyGoneBad Tue 21-Jul-09 21:12:49

Have you tried audiclear (I think this is what it's called), you can also get something from the pharmacy.

The practice nurse might be where to go if all this fails, I wouldn't bother a GP though, maybe if I'd tried everything else.

DesperateHousewifeToo Tue 21-Jul-09 21:30:01

Ds had his syringed by the ptactice nurse last year (he would have been about 6yrs then).

We tried the drops which softened the wax but did not get rid of it. He was still not hearing much through that ear so then had to have it syringed.

MrsJamesMartin Tue 21-Jul-09 21:32:19

It depends on what your surgery does. As a practice nurse I wouldn't touch a childs ear would always refer to ENT

Sidge Tue 21-Jul-09 21:33:22

I was a practice nurse and we weren't allowed to syringe under 12s. They had to be referred to ENT for microsuction (where the wax is sucked out rather than flushed out).

Have you tried olive oil? Usually softens it beautifully so it just slides out, often without syringing/suctioning.

emma1977 Tue 21-Jul-09 21:34:53

Wot Sidge said smile cos I wouldn't argue with my practice nurses!

cocolepew Wed 22-Jul-09 10:40:55

Thanks.

TsarChasm Wed 22-Jul-09 10:43:50

Yes it's microsuction now. My dd has had it.

I think on balance syringing would have been a whole lot more effective and less upsetting all round for her. I really wish she could have had that instead.

ZZZenAgain Wed 22-Jul-09 10:45:22

sidge, I often have this problem myself with wax. How does the olive oil work. Would you just pour a bit in and keep the ear tilted for a while?

cocolepew Wed 22-Jul-09 10:47:01

I do have Audio clear I'll have to and hunt it out again. Our pracise nure only does adults ears after they've been to the GP, but of a faff, really.

ZZZenAgain Wed 22-Jul-09 10:52:39

that audio clear didn't work for me and I had to go and get the ears flushed out in the end

sarah293 Wed 22-Jul-09 11:00:13

Message withdrawn

Lilymaid Wed 22-Jul-09 11:13:56

Alternative to olive oil is a sodium bicarbonate solution. Ask your pharmacist to make up a solution. The advantage is that is doesn't leave a greasy mark on a pillow.

Sidge Wed 22-Jul-09 14:38:53

ZZZenagain try this:

Warm some olive oil - warm a receptacle NOT the oil directly or it will be too hot to use. You can either use a spoon, or buy a dropper from a pharmacy. Lie on your side and drop a few drops of the warmed oil into your ear. (It is easier if you have someone else to do this for you.)

Stay on your side and massage the cheek, in the dimple where your ear and cheek meet by your cheekbone if that makes sense. This helps to work the oil into the canal and the wax. Stay on your side for a few minutes then roll over and do the other side. Don't put cotton wool into the ear afterwards as the fibres can get stuck in the softened wax, so more wax builds up around the fibres!

Do this at least once a day preferably twice for 5-7 days. This is usually enough to avoid syringing but if you do still need syringing the wax will be nice and soft and slides out easily.

Riven we no longer do children as apparently the risk of perforation is higher with water syringing - their eardrums are thinner.

ZZZenAgain Wed 22-Jul-09 18:24:47

oh thanks very much sidge. I will try that.

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