Talk

Advanced search

Mumsnet has not checked the qualifications of anyone posting here. If you have any medical concerns we suggest you consult your GP.

ever heard of "lump in the back of the eye"? what can it be???

(11 Posts)
sunburntats Sat 20-Jun-09 18:55:02

?

sunburntats Sat 20-Jun-09 19:10:56

Its the mil.

That was her description...the Doctor found a lump in the back of my eye after i compained of flashing lights and problems seeing...

any ideas, cant be arsed googling..

sunburntats Sat 20-Jun-09 19:41:22

lumps anyone???

pinkhibiscus Sun 21-Jun-09 20:01:46

I'm an eye doc.Might be able to help if you had more info....

sunburntats Tue 23-Jun-09 18:28:41

She hasnt asked!

She is to have radiotherapy...proton therapy, then they will take a biopsy.

Its large, causing her to see flashing lights etc, no idea how long she has had these symptoms.She had a liver scan the other day.

doesnt sound good does it?

Whats the treatment based on the biopsy results?
is it curable, and what are the chances that it is not C?
how agressive is eye C?
Got so many questions....

sunburntats Tue 23-Jun-09 18:29:17

she is only 58. sad

wannaBe Tue 23-Jun-09 18:31:39

retinal blastoma?

Just a thought..

If she's having radiotherapy then no, it doesn't sound that great..

I had proton beam therapy in Liverpool last year at age 34. Is that where she has to go too? If so there's quite a lot online to read should you wish to scare yourself silly
Clatterbridge clinic

To try and answer your questions:

treatment for me (front of eye) was :
trip to Liverpool to see the consultant Mr. Di Mato to have all kinds of eye exams done - including a none too pleasant ultrasound of the eye.

another trip (Clatterbiridge) a few weeks after for the mask fitting

a week long trip to Clatterbridge, staying in a hotel which NHS pay for - being strapped bolted into a scary electric chair type thing with a nasty mask over my face and mouthpiece in, being zapped for a minute a day for a week.

3-6 monthly checks - got my next in August after 9 months break and hoping to be signed off.
Only side effects for me as very sensitive to light/wind and a bloody great big floater that distorts my vision.

I believe in the back of the eye that they operate a few weeks before the PBT and put "markers" into the back of the eye, to presumably stop rays hitting brain, but not 100% sure.

Yes curable, yes may be benign, can be aggressive, can be not. Helpful I know sorry blush

CAT me if you like, I also have a few photos during treatment.

Pippinella Tue 23-Jun-09 18:50:35

If its radiotherapy alone it may be a lymphoma, which actually isn't inside the eye but more in the soft tissues surrounding/behind it. If it was anything really aggressive they would be treating it by removing the eye I would imagine. They do use lead guards to prevent the radiation from damaging the eyeball.

sunburntats Tue 23-Jun-09 19:44:06

Oh thank you so much for your experience poppins!
That has made the whole thing a bit clearer.
She is having treatment in Liverpool yes, but it is all so sudden.

Think she has had lead guards fitted today, she has had "an operation" today but doesnt know what its for. sad
It is at the back of the eye.
they aim to take a sample (HOW????) to see what it is.

I don't think you really want to know how shock big needle. You are right in saying it is sudden, they really do get you through quickly, please don't take that as a sign of it being a bad thing and urgently needing treatment, it just appears to be the way they work, targets and all that no doubt.

Removing an eye is the very very very last resort so please don't worry about that. When she had her appointment the consultant will have gone through a checksheet with her detailing the odds of things such as cancer spreading/loss of eye/loss of life in % and it's very clear and easy to understand.

She should have been given a booklet with lots of info in.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now