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Best way to treat a weeping graze?

(10 Posts)
cornflakegirl Wed 06-Aug-08 21:43:47

DS (3) came off his scooter whilst going quite fast on Sunday morning. He escaped with remarkably little damage - one bloody knee, and a big patch of skin missing just above his ankle - prob about 3cm diameter.

He didn't want any plasters initially, so I just cleaned him up and left him alone, but I stuck a plaster on his ankle in the afternoon because the graze was weeping. I changed the plaster on Monday, and the wound was still wet (yellow gunk came off with the plaster). We changed that plaster this afternoon, and while the wound has dried out a bit around the edge, it's still bright pink and wet in the middle.

He's gone to bed without a plaster on, but I'm really not sure what to do for the best. I read somewhere that wounds that dry out take longer to heal and are more likely to scar. But I don't like the fact that changing the plaster seems to take the top of the wound.

Does anyone know the recommended way to treat this sort of wound?

Habbibu Wed 06-Aug-08 21:49:01

Melolin dressing? They're good for keeping wounds dry and protected - you get some gauze tape to put on top. Most chemists will have them. Much better than plasters for grazes.

cornflakegirl Wed 06-Aug-08 23:08:43

Habbibu - thanks, I had wondered about that, as I guess it would allow it to dry out more. Although I'm not sure if it would stick to the wound worse than a plaster?

MintChocAddict Wed 06-Aug-08 23:12:38

Fucidin cream. Used it on a weepy graze that DS had. Cleared it up in no time. Got it on prescription though so not sure if you can buy it over the counter.

AnotherFineMess Wed 06-Aug-08 23:15:27

DH has just lost half of his shin playing football and he has bought 'wound wash' a spray that cleans the wound without it needing to be touched, and Elastoplast spray- on plaster - sorry not sure if suitable for a 3 yr old - but it's working well for him so might be worth checking out if you pass a Lloyds chemist.

charliecat Wed 06-Aug-08 23:18:27

Savlon have a new cream, called healing gel. It is amazing really clears up things quickly. Cream on then plaster/dressing.

AvenaLife Wed 06-Aug-08 23:19:03

I'd get rid of the plaster. It keeps them moist because they are unable to dry out properly. Melonin also does this. The best thing you can do is keep it uncovered and let the air dry it out. It should stop weeping quite quickly if it dries out. Plasters are good for bleeding but not good for weeping as the site will start to weep again when the plaster is removed or will make it soggy. You can get plasters for blisters which might help as they are designed to absorb any leeky fluid and promote healing. (Hydrocolloid I think). Boots sell them.

cornflakegirl Wed 06-Aug-08 23:39:50

Hmmm... well, been googling, and found lots of researchy stuff about keeping wounds moist... but just phoned NHS Direct, and the nurse said let it dry out. And I'm pretty sure that's what my mum would have done too. And I'm still here. (With a few scars, but generally from stuff that needed stitches...)

Thanks for the cream etc recommendations everyone - might pursue them if it's still manky in a couple of days. And Avena - thanks for the common sense wink.

PrincessPeaHead Wed 06-Aug-08 23:43:46

don't use creams, they usually hinder healing. savlon is the pits.

I would clean it with tcp diluted down with warm water, then let it air dry, and endeavour to leave it uncovered. certainly I'd leave it uncovered overnight, if it needs some protection during the day initially, I'd put on a gauze dressing with some tape.

But clean with antiseptic and then air i reckon.

AvenaLife Wed 06-Aug-08 23:44:33

You're welcome. I had a burn on my hand when I was younger. My mum kept putting melonin on it and it took ages to heal. It dried up when I took it off, went soggy when she put it on. Doh!

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