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Are there any anaesthetists on here - I have a quick question

(11 Posts)
Deminism Tue 02-Apr-19 21:01:14

Thanks

OP’s posts: |
tessiegirl Tue 02-Apr-19 21:03:02

Ask the question?

ivykaty44 Tue 02-Apr-19 21:04:37

.

GeorgieTheGorgeousGoat Tue 02-Apr-19 21:06:42

You actually have to type the question, they aren’t telepathic grin

Deminism Tue 02-Apr-19 21:14:46

lol. yes you are right. Was waiting for them to just appear....

DD is 8 and has to have a little GA to remove a mole. Ten mins, day surgery. For some reason I am inordinately anxious about this even though (probably because) she had three GAs (two long, one short) as a baby and toddler. No doubt this is triggering all that.

Anyway I am a bit fixated on the odds of kids dying due to GA which I know is incredibly low probability but that is where my mind is. I just wondered if having had three GAs before means these chances are even lower because she has had them before i.e. if when people do react badly it is the first time they have had GA but if you have had successfully then it shouldn't be a problem again. If that makes sense.

(Yes I know these issues are mine not hers and not the doctors. I am keeping them internal but thought here would be a good place to ask).

OP’s posts: |
MrsMaisel Tue 02-Apr-19 22:03:24

For some perspective - occasionally kids need multiple GAs and they get through it. My son had treatment requiring 30 GAs. 1 every weekday for 6 weeks. It blew my mind that this was even a possibility. I have lost count of the total no of GAs he has now had with various medical procedures. He's 5 years out from treatment now - with no ill effects from the anaesthesia. I would try not to overthink this. It's not risk free - but can she manage it without a GA? If it's going to be traumatic or difficult without a GA - don't sweat it.

sallysparrow157 Tue 02-Apr-19 22:13:42

Death and really serious complications from anaesthesia are incredibly incredibly rare. The fact that she's had anaesthetics before and been fine is helpful as we will know that her airway is likely to be normal and that she doesn't react to the anaesthetic drugs. She is likely to have a very very gentle anaesthetic for a mole removal - they'll pop some local in once shes asleep so they can give her as little anaesthesia as possible. Best thing to do is ask the anaesthetist - they'll be used to parents asking all sorts of questions and will be able to reassure you

Evidencebased Tue 02-Apr-19 22:20:29

I don't know why we , as a society, regard anaesthetics as dangerous.

If the patient is not v old, already seriously ill, or has significant heart problems, anaesthetics simply aren't dangerous.

Maybe yonks ago, when ether was dripped onto masks in Victorian times, they were. But it simply isn't true now.

Modern drugs are vastly safer, and more controllable.

Of course it's always worrying when it's your child.
But anaesthetics as a danger- no.

Deminism Tue 02-Apr-19 22:40:52

Thank you. The issues are mine. I appreciate the responses.

Also that is really helpful SallySparrow thank you

OP’s posts: |
Deminism Tue 02-Apr-19 22:41:30

Also MrsMaisel - that must've been so traumatic for you and him. Sending love

OP’s posts: |
NigellaAwesome Tue 02-Apr-19 23:01:47

Can I do a slight hijack? Can any anaesthetists advise why it has such a severe effect on hair condition, and what can I do to prevent it? I'm due to have a 90 minute procedure in a month or so.

And can they cause depression?

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