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Flouride toothpaste for babies - is it safe

(21 Posts)
anemaskell Sat 04-Nov-17 10:00:07

Hi all - should I have concerns about this? Does flouride cause neurological conditions if swallowed in bulk for babies?

The nhs state that flouride toothpaste should be used as soon as teeth come through.

Thanks!

MissConductUS Sat 04-Nov-17 10:44:52

It's perfectly safe and advisable. Don't let the nutters sway you.

Harvard Study

CupanTaeAnois Sat 04-Nov-17 10:52:19

Fluoride toothpaste after 2yrs, water and toothbrush sufficient before that.

Oly5 Sat 04-Nov-17 10:54:06

After 2?! No way. They need proper toothpaste before that.
Of course fluoride toothpaste is fine.. it’s a key part of healthy teeth

RatherBeCrazy Sat 04-Nov-17 10:57:55

It’s all about how many parts per million (ppm) are in it. Can’t remember the number off the top of my head but all baby toothpastes comply with the safe limits as long as you only put a smear on.

MissConductUS Sat 04-Nov-17 11:02:20

as long as you only put a smear on

Most people use way too much toothpaste. A blob the size of a pea is more than sufficient even for adults.

Unihorn Sat 04-Nov-17 11:06:00

I was confused by this too as my daughter had her first two teeth at two months and I was a bit concerned about toothpaste that young. I used water for the first few months and then toothpaste at about 5 months. I remember googling lots but not really getting real clarification. I think some American advise was to not use toothpaste before 2 so it was a tad confusing.

Unihorn Sat 04-Nov-17 11:06:11

I was confused by this too as my daughter had her first two teeth at two months and I was a bit concerned about toothpaste that young. I used water for the first few months and then toothpaste at about 5 months. I remember googling lots but not really getting real clarification. I think some American advise was to not use toothpaste before 2 so it was a tad confusing.

UserThenLotsOfNumbers Sat 04-Nov-17 11:11:28

I use the Boots own brand 0-2 years toothpaste for my one year old daughter.
She hasn’t grown an extra head or anything yet grin

UserThenLotsOfNumbers Sat 04-Nov-17 11:11:53

Should add, it has fluoride in it

Ktown Sat 04-Nov-17 16:02:17

Unless a child is eating the toothpaste then it is fine.
I still only use a smear on milk teeth anyway.

dementedpixie Sat 04-Nov-17 16:08:02

Use a smear of 1000ppm toothpaste for under 2s and pea sized for over 2s. I think from then (2) you can use adult levels of fluoride i.e. 1450ppm

dementedpixie Sat 04-Nov-17 16:10:32

Sorry it's a smear up to 3 years then a pea sized blob

dementedpixie Sat 04-Nov-17 16:13:47

From the Scottish childsmile website:

At home, encourage healthy habits and use a toothbrush and toothpaste with at least 1000 (parts per million (ppm) fluoride.

For children under three years of age use asmearof fluoride toothpaste on to a dry brush.

For children aged three years and above, use apea-sizedamount of at least 1000 - 1500 ppm (parts per million) fluoride toothpaste.

CupanTaeAnois Sun 05-Nov-17 12:54:09

Nursing infants and children under age 2 years can swallow most, if not all, of the toothpaste when brushing, there has been concern that the use of fluoride toothpaste containing 1,000-1,500 ppm F could give rise to enamel fluorosis of the front permanent incisors. Enamel fluorosis is a condition which can vary from minor white spots to unsightly yellow/ brown discolouration of the enamel due to excessive intake of fluoride. In response to the concern over enamel fluorosis, some manufacturers now market low fluoride "children's" or "paediatric" toothpastes containing less than 600 ppm fluoride. The effectiveness of these low fluoride 'children's' or 'padeiatric' toothpstes in preventing caries has not been established. What has been shown by a number of systematic reviews is that toothpastes with a low fluoride concentration of 250ppm F are less effective than toothpastes with the standard 1,000-1,500 ppm F at preventing caries in permanent teeth.

Recommendations on the use of fluoride toothpaste in children have been produced by the Expert Body on Fluorides and Health
(http://www.fluoridesandhealth.ie/ external link). These recommendations aim to minimise the risk of fluorosis from fluoride toothpaste while maximising its caries-preventive benefits. These recommendations can be found here.

For further information on dental fluorosis please see http://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/fluorosis

dementedpixie Sun 05-Nov-17 15:05:44

Is that not why only smear of toothpaste is advised in that age group, so as to minimise swallowing

CupanTaeAnois Sun 05-Nov-17 22:29:48

The Irish studies and advice are saying no fluoride toothpaste under 2 to prevent fluorosis.

dementedpixie Sun 05-Nov-17 23:00:37

But Irish water has fluoride added whereas a lot of places (like Scotland where I am) does not. We ate advised to use fluoride toothpaste from when teeth first arrive and also to register with a dentist at that point too

lampshade21 Sun 05-Nov-17 23:35:01

Demented pixie has given the correct advice to OP query.

Here in the UK we (dentists) are guided by Public Health England “Delivering Better Oral Health-Toolkit for Prevention” 2017. 3rd edition. The particular query from OP is answered on Page 6, link here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachmentdata/file/605266/Deliveringg_betterorall_health.pdf

BrioAmio Mon 06-Nov-17 00:05:26

My HV was quite adamant that DS, then 2, should be using fluoride toothpaste with 1400ppm as many children’s toothpastes had too little fluoride.

She was quite evangelical about it. (Which was odd as she was there to discuss his gross motor skills only!)

lampshade21 Mon 06-Nov-17 20:25:24

It’s definitely 1000ppmF until age 3 and then as near to 1500ppmF fluoride thereafter. See my earlier link.
{Children’s dentist btw}

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