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Just been told I have an overactive thyroid....

(13 Posts)
chuckieegg2008 Tue 23-Feb-16 20:50:49

Went to GP this morning as lost a lot of weight and some of my nails are pitting. He did various blood tests.
Just had a phone call from out of hours GP to say that my blood shows I have a overactive thyroid and to make an appointment with GP tomorrow, so he can arrange a hospital appointment.
Im worried surely its not normal for an out of hours GP to phone at 8.30pm.

NurseRosie Fri 26-Feb-16 11:24:41

Hi. I have an under active thyroid and when I was diagnosed my levels were so low the lab couldn't record a level. They didn't rush me in or even refer me on, my GP dealt with it, although I question whether they should, they can be a bit rubbish at times. I would say trust your body. If you are feeling ok, no racing pulse, palpitations or tremors I wouldn't panic. If it was dangerous they would have sent you in straight away and not let you wait to see your GP. Trusts work in different ways, it may be normal for your OOH GPs to review abnormal results to relieve the job from day staff.

I hope you get sorted and feel better soon x

Clarella Fri 26-Feb-16 18:17:32

Hi chuckle, it's really good this has been picked up. There's a bit of a road to recovery but you will recover.

The British thyroid foundation are an excellent source of info and support.

The best book to explain EVERYTHING is the BMA book by dr A Toft called understanding thyroid disorders which covers under and over active. Some people with over active become under through treatment so it's handy to know all the ins and out (not all by any means and the book explains the different ways it can go). About £5 on Amazon, definitely worth getting.

Huge hugs, there's a big element of learning to be patient and pacing yourself through this. You will probably be referred to an endocrinologist to work out your best treatment.

chuckieegg2008 Fri 26-Feb-16 19:27:53

Hi thanks for the replies. I went to see GP last night and she explained about overactive thyroids and went through the symptoms turns out I have a few of them. I've been feeling so well in myself recently but when my gp went through the symptoms i realised i had a lot of them.
She has sent an urgent referral to the hospital and i should see them within 4 weeks so will know then what my treatment will be.

Myrtlethetyrtle Fri 26-Feb-16 19:33:14

The GP rang me too when I got my diagnosis. I was at the consultants within a week. I was worried at first but I was only on the meds for 6 months then I was fine. It was post partum associated and I'm now under active. Oh how I miss all that weight loss smile. I'm sure all will be well managed once you've seen the specialist.

chuckieegg2008 Fri 26-Feb-16 20:24:13

Thanks Myrtle good to know it can be treated fairly quickly. I think mine is hereditary my Grandmother had her thyroid out not sure if she was over or under.
Im a bit worried about work, if I have to have a lot of appointments will struggle to get time off.

LurcioAgain Fri 26-Feb-16 20:47:51

Back about 10 years ago when I had an episode, the standard first line of treatment was "block and replace" - carbimazole to block the action of your thyroid, then once your hormone levels had dropped, thyroxine to replace the missing thyroid hormones. Effectively, they give your thyroid a rest for 6 months to a year. The reason for doing this is (in the absence of antibodies suggesting it's an autoimmune problem), in about 50% of cases, it spontaneously clears up when you come off the drugs and you need no further treatment (which was, luckily, the case for me). My grandmother had her thyroid out too - I don't think that has a bearing on whether you have the type that will clear up given treatment or not.

It will depend on your GP - I had to have quite a few blood tests as they have to tweak the drugs till they get the levels right, but my surgery was quite good about giving me morning appointments before work. I did however feel completely knackered until the drugs started working.

But fingers crossed - it is treatable, and in most cases will have a good outcome, and there's an evens chance it will clear up after treatment, and you won't need anything more. If block and replace doesn't work, the preferred treatment is to try radioactive iodine to destroy part, but not all, of your thyroid's natural activity - this can leave you with an underactive thyroid and dependent on thyroxine. But you have options - you can opt for surgery (not often done these days) or further courses of block and replace.

Good luck with it - and if you can take any time off work, and your doctor offers to sign you off, I'd take them up on it (in retrospect, given how crap I felt, I regret dragging myself into work when I was actually quite ill - but I'd got to the palpitations/visual disturbances/continual sweats and breathlessness stage, because I stupidly put off going to the doctor, doing my "strong silent type" act until my mum kicked my arse).

Clarella Sat 27-Feb-16 09:07:49

I agree with lurcio regarding not being too 'brave' about this - the symptoms can be insidious, a bit 'invisible' to others and you may suddenly find you are utterly exhausted from trying to keep up with life when your body just can't. The same occurs in under active too in a different way. Some of the weight loss is actually muscle loss hence the importance of trying to pace, though not easy as you feel so edgy. It can be a bit boom and bust. In me in the past, (being underactive) has and can affect my mh as I try so hard to keep everything going then feel an utter failure when I can't, then find I need more thyroxine! Last year though I was in too much and the muscle cramps were awful. Took a while to recover. I'd been on too much once before and it hadn't been like that.

Discuss with your dr, if you're ok at the mo just take it easy, I don't know if a 'fit' note would be helpful now, or discussions with OC health (to advise your managers) but time off may be needed later on. It's important to emphasise the importance of the appointments to work.

Clarella Sat 27-Feb-16 09:30:29

I agree with lurcio regarding not being too 'brave' about this - the symptoms can be insidious, a bit 'invisible' to others and you may suddenly find you are utterly exhausted from trying to keep up with life when your body just can't. The same occurs in under active too in a different way. Some of the weight loss is actually muscle loss hence the importance of trying to pace, though not easy as you feel so edgy. It can be a bit boom and bust. In me in the past, (being underactive) has and can affect my mh as I try so hard to keep everything going then feel an utter failure when I can't, then find I need more thyroxine! Last year though I was in too much and the muscle cramps were awful. Took a while to recover. I'd been on too much once before and it hadn't been like that.

Discuss with your dr, if you're ok at the mo just take it easy, I don't know if a 'fit' note would be helpful now, or discussions with OC health (to advise your managers) but time off may be needed later on. It's important to emphasise the importance of the appointments to work.

chuckieegg2008 Sat 27-Feb-16 18:47:21

Thanks for all for your advice 😀

Im off work now for 2 weeks holiday so will be able to take it easy. Hopefully within those 2 weeks I might get my hospital appointment and start treatment. Im just worried with work, we have a policy that if you are off 3 times in 2 years with sickness you go down disciplinary route, so hoping that I won't need to take too much time off.

Clarella Sun 28-Feb-16 09:43:01

It might be worth talking to GP/ specialist about what to expect, from a PoV of impact on work, and then inquiring about whether OC health could help in any way. It's possible that it could be covered by the disability at work act. I was told this could be the case with hypothyroidism as they take the view that without the medication I'd be dead, thus issues with medication can cause issues, though for a tribunal to decide. Things thyroid can take a while sometimes to fully get back to 'normal' in terms of how strong you are and how clearly you an think and sleep. It can also affect your mh too. joints and muscles can take a while to fully recover if things have been bad for a while. (This is all worst case scenario though - others are mildly affected for a while)

I say this only because I too have tried pretending all is fine and struggling on only to nose dive terribly.

As I say, the British thyroid foundation are excellent - there are volunteers you can ring to talk to about your specific concerns (they've been through it). And the Toft book is very useful too as explains the different scenarios.

cosamangiare Tue 01-Mar-16 01:20:51

Hi op, my thyroid suddenly became very overactive a little over a year ago, my GP phoned me in a panic and insisted I see her right away which made me think I was dying! She'd already spoken to the endocrinologist and they started me on carbimazole (antithyroid) and propranolol (my resting heart rate had doubled) immediately. After about 4 weeks I had a scan then met the endocrinologist, tests for all the thyroid things and antibodies (which showed probable Graves' disease which runs in my family) radioactive iodine didn't work for me but the meds have got things under control. Thyroid clinic is nice, I alternate appointments between the endocrinologist and the thyroid nurse and it's much less frequent now my thyroid is behaving itself.

I had a lot of symptoms which I'd attributed to other things, the main thing I remember is an awful feeling of apprehension and my heart racing and a fatigue like nothing I've known before. These went away fairly soon with treatment and I'm pretty much back to normal now.

chuckieegg2008 Wed 09-Mar-16 19:21:12

Hi everyone just wanted to give an update. Had a letter from endo for my gp to start me on 20mg carbimazole and 40mg propranolol so have started on them.

Should hopefully have an appointment with endo in the next few weeks, if I haven't GP wants me to see her so she can see how Im doing.

Bit worried about the side effects of carbimazole, how severe does a sore throat have to be before contacting GP?

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