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How do you know if you are eligibly disabled

(8 Posts)
xalyssx Wed 06-Jan-16 01:34:42

I was buying tickets today for an event, and it said "Visitors registered as 'Disabled' should call this number". This event has uneven paths.
How does someone register as disabled? I have hip problems, diabetes and mild learning difficulties. I have an official diagnosis of my learning difficulties, and I receive DLA for my diabetes, but in this situation my hip problems are most prevalent. The problem lies in that I have no "evidence" as such of my hip problems; I have no piece of paper from the doctor, I have no blue badge. The doctors have said that I need occasional physiotherapy for now.
I can walk fine most of the time, I just can't predict when my hip will pop halfway out of its socket next, and I am interested to know if there is anything that I can do about it.

PausingFlatly Wed 06-Jan-16 01:46:40

I've never come across this register of disability, either, but term remains ubiquitous.

In practice, if you get DLA then the award letter seems to be reasonably well accepted.

In this instance, it just sounds like they're making sure everyone knows they're happy to work with visitors to enable the best possible access. Since the uneven paths could be a problem for you, better to call than not.

JonSnowKnowsNowt Wed 06-Jan-16 02:56:40

Local councils used to keep a register of disabled people And give you a registration cArd - not sure if this still applies

TaintedAngel Wed 06-Jan-16 03:00:11

Ime it just means if you get DLA. And not many places actually ask to see the proof in practice.

NotCitrus Wed 06-Jan-16 05:25:30

There's no such thing as registered disabled and hasn't for at least 20 years, but many people still think that it's the phrase to use. (councils are still supposed to let you register as deaf and possibly with some other needs, but in practice this doesn't happen).

The Equality Act 2010 requires them to make reasonable adjustments for any disabled person under the Act (ie something affecting ability to do something for more than 9 months), so whether you get DLA should also be irrelevant - though a useful way to prove some needs if what you need involves them getting less money.

I wouldn't worry about what your DLA is officially awarded 'for' - the system is so bonkers and people never fit into boxes neatly anyway. If they could do something to make your day more feasible, like offering nearer parking/a wheelchair/a free ticket for a companion, call the number and ask.

I've been awarded PIP with arcane reasoning, but over the years I concluded I should accept discounts etc where available, to help counteract all the places that aren't accessible or will have me exhausted for a week - swings and roundabouts.

wannabestressfree Wed 06-Jan-16 05:32:52

With regard to tickets you are generally 'disabled' if in receipt of dla/ pip and can access disabled tickets + one free carer. This applies to the cinema too.

lightskipping Wed 06-Jan-16 05:41:10

I get DLA which I consider myself to qualify as registered disabled, although as pp said, there is no such register. I'm not visibly disabled though, and have never actually been asked for proof of disability at any events where I've booked a disabled/carer ticket, except the cinema where I have a specific card.

Oldisthenewblack Wed 06-Jan-16 11:52:13

It really annoys me when people ask me "are you registered disabled?" as this confused me for a long time. As previous posters have said, it's usually down to if you're in receipt of DLA/PIP. With the cinema, there's the CEA card that you can apply for - this allows you to take someone into the cinema with you free of charge, a carer/companion.

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