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Just started running - how long before it gets easier?

(11 Posts)
BeeBopBunny Sat 28-May-11 19:23:06

Just started running this week - aiming to run three times a week, starting gently. I've been twice now, just round the block, which takes me about 8 minutes. I'm aiming to lose that extra 2 kilos (mummy tummy..) and improve my general level of fitness. Just wondered how long it will take for the runs to get easier so I can increase the distance I run? A couple of weeks maybe?

Sam100 Sat 28-May-11 19:27:19

A couple of weeks is about right. Are you doing any kind of plan? There are lots of couch to 5k plans on the net that can get you from nothing to running 5k in about 8 to 10 weeks - here is one. Start off slow and steady - and don't be afraid to repeat weeks if you don't feel ready to move on!

BeeBopBunny Sat 28-May-11 20:06:12

Thanks Sam - no I hadn't been following a plan, but perhaps I should. I'll have a look.

BlackandGold Sat 28-May-11 20:09:36

When I started I did 1 min run then 2 mins walk x 10. Couldn't quite manage the last 2 runs the first week!

The schedule in Running Made Easy is good and the book is an interesting read

WhereamI Sun 29-May-11 07:04:01

second B&G's advice...walk..run..walk..run...it helps you run more distance and for longer. I found 3 times a week helps enormously..if it drops below this it gets harder again. I now can run 5 miles continuously.

allhailtheaubergine Sun 29-May-11 07:07:18

I did it with the couch to 5k podcasts. Really recommend them. Brilliant.

I find any exercise gets easier at about the 3 week mark. Well - it doesn't get easier because you just push yourself harder, but the recovery time gets shorter, and personally I really start to enjoy it at about 3 weeks.

Pedallleur Sun 29-May-11 09:26:50

If it gets easier you aren't getting better as you become 'used' to a certain level. But you have made a start. The walk/run advice is good. Make sure you have good shoes if you intend to continue. If there is a club nearby it may be worthwhile running with them if they have a beginners group

larrygrylls Sun 29-May-11 11:21:24

I think that a lot of people start out trying to run too fast, getting into oxygen debt and then having a tough and horrid time of it (I know I did when I started). The secret is to run slowly and for a longer period. The rule of thumb for a medium distance (10k, say) is to aim to be "comfortably uncomfortable" or to be able to carry out a conversation with a little effort whilst running. If you have a heart rate monitor, try and run at around 75/80% of your max, which is approximately (220-your age).

Congrats on making the effort and, once you work out what works for you, it will get a lot easier.

BeeBopBunny Sun 29-May-11 19:52:17

Thanks for the replies. I've got some fantastically comfy asics running shoes which I love. I don't really want to join a club as i run when DH gets back from work and I can't be sure when that will be, which makes it hard to plan. I'm actually looking forward to tomorrow's run...

howdoo Mon 30-May-11 01:38:32

Agree with the couch to 5k suggestions - google any number of them. I remember the first time I could run a mile without being ridiculously out of breath - I was SO proud of myself! Keep going, you will get better quicker than you think, and you will be so happy with yourself. A few months after I started running, I ran 7 miles with some (marathon level) friends - the first time, I practically died, the second was OK and the third was really quite easy! I couldn't believe how quickly you progress.

Popbiscuit Mon 30-May-11 01:47:09

Agree with all of the above advice and just to add...not only does it get easier, but it becomes fun!

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