Talk

Advanced search

Daughter with child passport

(25 Posts)
user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 15:06:34

Hi all,

Wondered if you can help, I plan to go on a trip with my daughter who is currently 15 yrs old but will be 16 when she travels later this year. She's got her passport sorted while she is 15 so she has a child passport.

Her surname is different to mine so of course I know about parental permission etc to travel while she is 15 but will we need all that when she is 16? She's an adult yes but would they query this because she's got a child's passport?

TIA

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 15:09:21

Sorry when I say query I mean will I still need a notorised letter from her mother when she is 16 with a child's passport?

xyzandabc Fri 17-Mar-17 15:10:18

Is it a British passport? If so, as far as I'm aware, a child's passport is the same as an adults. It's just that they are only valid for 5 years rather than 10. As long as it's still valid, she can travel on it, it makes no difference whether it is adult or child.

Snap8TheCat Fri 17-Mar-17 15:10:26

She's not an adult until 18.

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 15:21:41

Yes a British passport. Yeah that's what I thought the only difference between the passports is the expiry at least they don't look any different.

No she's an adult when she is 16 in the UK.

Snap8TheCat Fri 17-Mar-17 16:04:34

No really an adult is 18 in the U.K.

musicteacheriz Fri 17-Mar-17 16:07:38

From the government website

PotteringAlong Fri 17-Mar-17 16:07:45

No she's an adult when she is 16 in the UK.

No she isn't!

Iamastonished Fri 17-Mar-17 16:15:45

An adult passport is from 16. To be legally considered an adult in the UK you have to be 18.

HTH

BonnesVacances Fri 17-Mar-17 16:16:13

I think what OP means is that she gets an adult passport at 16.

They shouldn't query it. DD's passport runs out next month and she's not 16 until later in the year. She'll be able to travel on her 5-year child's passport until she's 20 and then she'll get an adult's one when she renews.

Snap8TheCat Fri 17-Mar-17 16:43:05

I thought the issue was whether he needed the mothers written permission to take his (adult?) daughter out of the country because she will still be on a child's passport.

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 17:01:57

So even though you get adult passports at 16 you aren't considered an adult until you're 18? Talk about confusing people!

By the same token, if she was to travel for work with just her and a colleague at 16 then would she need permission from her mother to do that? If yes, then that's preposterous!

Yes the query is if we need written permission to go abroad with here when my daughter is 16.

Iamastonished Fri 17-Mar-17 17:09:51

"So even though you get adult passports at 16 you aren't considered an adult until you're 18?"

I thought it was common knowledge that you aren't legally considered an adult in the UK until you were 18. Are you not from the UK?

The age of majority in most countries is 18, but it is 21 in the US. It should not be confused with the age of sexual consent, marriageable age, school leaving age, drinking age, driving age, voting age or smoking age - or getting an adult passport.

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 17:29:09

Yes I'm in the UK but in Scotland. I think you're an adult when you're 16 in Scotland?

www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1991/50/section/1

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 17:30:06

At least to some degree I think. Too many contradictions!

SoupDragon Fri 17-Mar-17 17:33:15

if she was to travel for work with just her and a colleague at 16 then would she need permission from her mother to do that?

DS went to the USA last year, aged 17, on a child passport. He had no letter from me.

SoupDragon Fri 17-Mar-17 17:34:02

So even though you get adult passports at 16 you aren't considered an adult until you're 18? Talk about confusing people!

You pay adult fare on a plane from 12 smile

SoupDragon Fri 17-Mar-17 17:34:46

Is getting a letter from her mother a problem?

Trollspoopglitter Fri 17-Mar-17 17:39:11

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/118782/children-policy.pdf

No it's 18. The age of consent may be 16 and age of criminal responsibility may be 8 in Scotland, but you're still considered a child.

You need to check with

Trollspoopglitter Fri 17-Mar-17 17:46:21

(Got cut off) proper authorities but according to official website, you will need parental permission for a child if you don't have parental responsibilities. www.gov.uk/permission-take-child-abroad

End of day, you will be traveling on a British passport, so you need to adhere to those rules for international travel.

Trollspoopglitter Fri 17-Mar-17 17:47:48

Which airline is that, soupdragon? <hopeful> Or was that a typo for 2 years of age?

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 18:03:01

Getting a letter from her mum might be a problem. For now she is giving permission but who knows what here mood will be when it comes to actually leaving the country. I don't want to book a holiday only for her mum to ruin it all.

I am her father but the problem is I have no parental rights even though my name is on her birth certificate because she was born out of wed-lock.

I know these are the rules but it seems bizarre to me if every 16 and 17 yr old needs parental permission to leave the country if they are traveling with someone who is possibly not related to them.

Trollspoopglitter Fri 17-Mar-17 18:13:55

Get a letter of permission from her for this specific trip citing dates and flight times and notarize it before you book tickets? Find out if she can withdraw permission thereafter (I'd imagine so, but it would probably be quite difficult and she's need to demonstrate a cause?) and see if travel insurance would cover your refund if she pulled permission. At least your daughter will see you've tried. Or save they money for two years and take a really exciting trip as her birthday gift!

user1489762750 Fri 17-Mar-17 19:07:49

Good advice Troll I'll see if the insurance will cover anything like this. It's infuriating when her mother holds all the cards though!

KP86 Fri 17-Mar-17 19:50:21

Trollspoop, generally speaking, airfares for 2-12yo aren't quite as expensive as full adult fares, as the taxes are less.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now