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Speed limits and debit cards in Germany and Belgium

(4 Posts)
MrsSatsuma Sat 09-Jul-11 16:13:24

Can anyone confirm speed limits for driving with a small trailer (under 500kg) in Belgium and Germany?

Also, I know credit cards aren't widely accepted in Germany, but will I be able to pay by debit card?

Thank you!

kreecherlivesupstairs Sun 10-Jul-11 06:40:07

I'm in Belgium without a trailer. Do they make a difference to how fast you can drive (genuine question). Both CC and DC accepted in our little corner of heaven wink

Portofino Sun 10-Jul-11 20:04:16

Very common to pay with debit cards in Belgium. Some supermarkets don't accept credit cards- check first. The speed limit is 120km - but everyone is totally mad on the motorway so I would advise taking it steady. The German autobahns generally have NO speed limit. Where there is it will be signed.

Kladdkaka Wed 13-Jul-11 17:32:52

German autobahns do have a defact speed limit. You are allowed to drive as fast as you like so long as you are driving safely. Anything over 130km/h is normally considered unsafe.

Speed limits when you're towing a trailer can be really daft in some countries in Europe. I live in Sweden and frequently drive to the UK via Denmark, Germany, Holland, Belgium and France with a trailer so I can fill up with Cadbury's, pot noodles and bisto.

Anyways, the trailer speed in Germany is 80km/h. See German tourist board website: http://www.germany-tourism.co.uk/EGB/practical_information/driving_in_germany_9847.htm

Belgium doesn't have a seperate speed limit, it's the same as cars without 120km/h.

As you enter the countries you will find there are huge signs reminding you of the changes in speed limit.

Also worth noting, some of the motorways only allow trailers in the slow lane, or restrict overtaking to certain times. There are fairly easy to understand signs up whenever this applies, so keep your eyes peeled.

Also don't forget that in Belgium it is compulsory to have a reflective jacket in the car and a warning triangle. You are not allowed to get out of the car on a hard shoulder without a reflective jacket. We have those little fold up reflective vests for everyone in the glove compartment. They also strongly recommend a first aid kit and fire extinguisher, which are compulsory for Belgian cars. Germany also strongly recommend all of the above plus a set of replacement bulbs as they are also compulsory for German cars.

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