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Creating privacy in rear garden

(10 Posts)
ChesterFuckingDraws Thu 02-Jun-16 22:11:13

We have a NE facing rear garden with open fencing (picture attached) Which has an access path for our neighbours around the outside of our fencing. DH is wanting to make it a bit more private but we are unsure of the best way to go about this, any ideas how we could go about it that are easy for novice gardeners to do?

JT05 Fri 03-Jun-16 09:06:42

I'd start with some bamboo in big pots, NOT in the garden because it spreads! I have planted the tallish variety for a similar purpose.

Spend what you can afford, they are quite expensive, on 3 plants and put them in big simple, cheap plastic pots. Sit them on slabs, spread evenly along your fence line.

They will need a fair amount of water, but grow quite quickly and are lovely swaying in the wind.

MadSprocker Fri 03-Jun-16 09:55:10

Depends if you want quick temporary, or something more permanent. I would put some sort of screening immediately in front of the fence for a temporary measure. For a more permanent solutions I would put trellis on top of the fence and plant a selection of climbers, ivy, jasmine, clematis along the fence. Some varieties grow quicker than others.

ChesterFuckingDraws Sat 04-Jun-16 05:22:22

Thank you, I think DH is wanting a quick fix whereas I'd prefer to start growing a
Hedge or something. Thank you for the ideas

Ditsy4 Sat 04-Jun-16 06:16:04

I would grow a variety of shrubs as much nicer than a hedge because you have them flowering at different times. Buddlia grows quickly. We screened a section with a burgandy leaved cherry tree, unusual gorse, mock orange, buddhleia and flowering quince on the fence. It grew in a couple of years.

Artandco Sat 04-Jun-16 07:24:31

I would build a raised flower bed along the fence. So you basically have a large rectangular pot alone the whole wall around a metre or just under high, and fill with tall growing plants or bushes. Could grow fruit and veg there if you wanted

nuttymango Sat 04-Jun-16 07:27:03

We have a large raised bed in front of our back fence, privacy was provided by trees on the other side but the council came and cut them down angryideas of what to plant in there would be much appreciated. The houses behind are on a steep hill so look down on our garden sad

shovetheholly Sat 04-Jun-16 07:29:14

I agree with ditsy. Put up some wires and cover the fence in climbers, then shrubs in front, in a bed that you create (dig out the turf, dig over the soil and add loads of compost, plant in). It will really green it up. Make sure you choose some things that are evergreen so you don't just lose the privacy in the winter.

You need to be careful what you select for a NE facing aspect - you're quite shaded on both sides there. Much will depend on whether the shade you have is damp or dry. Things that grow well in my north-facing garden are: fatsia, viburnums (these come in many beautiful varieties - tinus 'Eve Price' is lovely), eleagnus, mahonia, magnolia, photinia, - then ferns, japanese anemones, shade geraniums in front for low maintenance. Have a search on a site like 'crocus' for suggestions with pictures!

littlemonkey5 Sat 04-Jun-16 08:12:32

A quick fix, that isn't too expensive until you plant some shrubs.
www.primrose.co.uk/40m-20m-bamboo-cane-artificial-screening-papillon-p-23905.html

If you want a hedge, www.primrose.co.uk/height-upon-arrival-c-7767_10648_10843.html?src=def_cat_list

NaiceVillageOfTheDammed Sat 04-Jun-16 18:41:42

www.architecturalplants.com/plants/id/phillyrea-latifolia

I've got a row of these (phillyrea) planted as a hedge on stilts and planted underneath are some large hardy, flowering hebes.

Both the PL and the hebes are as tough as old boots. Costly initial layout but they look loverly - very formal.

Leaves stay on all year. Hedge on stilts doesn't take up space and clipping is minimal (tidy up/shape).

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