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Winter planting

(6 Posts)
TwllBach Sat 29-Sep-12 15:09:07

I'm relatively new to this gardening lark - I've been experimenting all summer. Nothing grew from seed apart from some oriental poppies. The lobelia I planted is thriving, as are the begonias and some daisy like flowers that I can't remember the name of.

I still have a fair bit of space - is there anything I could be planting now that will either flower over winter or prepare itself for spring? Anything st all!

MiniMonty Sun 30-Sep-12 04:41:54

Kind of depends where you live, what your soil is like etc but in a general way get some bulbs in now so that in the last few warm(ish) days of the year they get a chance to settle in and maybe put a root out - Daffodils, Tulips etc. You could also be planting parsnips, sprouts and garlic in the veg patch - also could get your asparagus, broad beans and peas going on. Spinach too (for a spring crop).
You could plant Foxgloves / Hardy Heathers / Wallflowers / Forget-me-nots / Sweet William and Polyanthus. Plant spring bedding plants such as aubrietia, alyssum & winter pansies for next year (gardening is a long game...)
Prune your roses in a couple of weeks when they stop producing blooms (and your fruit trees if they've cropped) or if you're old fashioned "keep roses at bay on Christmas day". Weed and dig over the flower beds, clean up (and clean out) your greenhouse.
Truth is if you are into gardening then for the next few weeks you are going to be sweeping up leaves more than anything else !

TwllBach Sun 30-Sep-12 08:15:10

That's amazing thank you! I will most definitely be doing the daffodil and tulip thing. I live in north Wales so any plants I want to grow have to be pretty hardy. I planted some lovely, tall delicate flowers at the beginning of "summer" and they just got beaten to death by the wind. I staked my oriental poppies but the smaller flowers were difficult to do that with - so that's one lesson learned! Daffodils will be fine though, here. I've been scouting out my neighbours' gardens and they had plenty!

I envision us being in this house a long time so I'm happy to play the long game. I have some forget me not seeds knocking around... Do I need to properly plant them or can I just sprinkle them?

Bienchen Sun 30-Sep-12 11:36:53

The new few weeks are still perfect for autumn planting which used to be the main season for planting before the advent of garden centres selling plants year round. Choose hardy plants suitable for your aspect (sunny/semishade/shady), don't forget to water if it doesn't rain for a few days. Exception will be hedges, roses and fruit trees which are best bought bare root and will be planted in winter. If you do go down the bare root route, then prepare the ground in advance as you do not know when your plants arrive and you may not have time/inclement weather to prepare your site. If you want to grow plants from seeds check out the seed packets for best sowing time.

MiniMonty Mon 01-Oct-12 01:08:22

North Wales... Daffs and Tulips definitely ! Go for the dwarf varieties if they're going to be exposed. The neighbours you speak of will have the best advice (and experience).
You will get the wind up there (and a lot of rain) so think about maybe planting something to break the wind (long term) like a hedge or even a blackberry (which you can harvest) - or maybe consider making a walled garden if you have the space and the bricks...
A cloche is a cheap and easy version of a greenhouse to get seedlings going and it's worth tuning in to Gardner's question time on Radio 4 although, as I said, the local knowledge is going to be the best. Just pick the best looking gardens, knock on the door and say "I love your garden, I've moved here recently, can you give me some advice". People will LOVE to bore you for hours with tips, tricks and advice and you'll come away with cuttings, seeds and some new friends.

sieglinde Wed 03-Oct-12 18:11:49

Bare-root roses - much cheaper than the container ones.

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