Talk

Advanced search

Baking with gluten-free flour

(8 Posts)
wonderingwondering Fri 02-Oct-09 10:14:48

Does it make any difference? I'm making a cake I've done before but using GF plain flour.

PeachyTentativelyPosting Fri 02-Oct-09 10:17:41

You might find you need a little extra fluid.

I find that recipes with lots of eggs are really good as they minimise the fluid issue but you do need to be aware that GF flour is very absorbent.It works exceptionally well though as a result with cakes including bananas, apples etc.

wonderingwondering Fri 02-Oct-09 11:48:55

Thanks, I'm making a cake with lots of butter and a fruit topping, so hopefully that will be OK. The recipe is one large egg but maybe I'll use two small ones.

nannyL Fri 02-Oct-09 23:35:17

GF flour does definitley make a difference... agree make it more liquidy and use extra egg...

unfortunatky just substituting normal flour for GF flour rarely makes the same thing as a GF version, due to the properties of the gluten

gomez Fri 02-Oct-09 23:38:54

Xanthen gum is what you need to make to rise. Plus, as had been said, more liquid of some form. Might also be useful to sub some almond flour for GF flour plus fire in a bit GF baking power.

However I have just realised you will I am sure already have made the cake and probably eaten it too.

wonderingwondering Sun 04-Oct-09 07:35:27

Am making it today. The recipe includes baking powder (I have a GF one). I'll give it a go but I may nip to the shops and buy a GF back-up pudding!

oopsacoconut Sun 04-Oct-09 07:40:16

I find that my GF cakes are a little dry but I make a sugar syrup. When the cake comes out the pan hot I spoon the syrup over the bottom of the cake to soak in. I makes a big difference.

pecanpie Sun 04-Oct-09 12:56:21

Ground almonds are a really useful addition because they are a bit oilier than flour. Xanthan gum also a necessity for things like scones. I'd recommend just starting off with a very basic cake recipe rather than making something more extravagant which might not turn out right - it takes a lot of trial and error.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now