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slow cookers - a good idea? And which one?

(8 Posts)
coveredinsnot Mon 07-Sep-09 11:34:06

Subject says it all really - I've been thinking a slow cooker would be a good idea as we're both working with a little one, and we love eating well. Plus we have a gas cooker which would be good to cut down on using as it's very expensive.

Anyone got a slow cooker, or recommend one? And/or a cookbook to use with one?

And is there really much difference between the expensive and cheap ones? E.g. I've seen one on Amazon for about £20, and another for £50, but can't really work out what the actual difference would be... they both heat food slowly...?

Thanks!

igivein Mon 07-Sep-09 12:40:48

Go for it. I use mine all the time. It makes cheap cuts of meat taste devine - really tender. and it's brill getting home from work and the house is full of a wonderful cooking smell and all you have to do is eat it (and wash up - but nothing in life is perfect!)
I can't advise on which to buy, I think mine cost £19.99 from Argos and it does the job.
I would say get a big one, make more than you need and freeze it - even more labour saving and if you do things like curry and chilli, the spices always seem to come through better after it's sat in the freezer for a while.

Goober Mon 07-Sep-09 12:44:59

I am now on my 3rd and this time I went for the Tesco cheapie one, it was £9.97 at the time, think it is now £13. It does everything I expect of it.
In fact today so far it has made my chicken stock, from carcus, over night and is now cooking chicken leek and potato soup for our tea.

AttillaTheHan Mon 07-Sep-09 12:53:37

Definately get one they are great. The others have said it all so far but I would definately recommend them.

We have a very big one (grin) and although it is great for cooking huge quantities at a time, its not so great when you only have enough ingredients to make one meal, as ours has a minimum level. So I think I would say to go for a medium sized one, if they exist...

We are in fact due to eat the second batch of beef casserole that I made at the weekend - great for when you've been busy all day!

AttillaTheHan Mon 07-Sep-09 12:54:55

Ooh forgot to say that our Russell Hobbs one came with a small cookery book which we used quite a lot at the beginning. I also get a lot of recipes off the internet and the recipe pages on here of course wink.

thereistheball Mon 07-Sep-09 14:15:17

I'm really enjoying mine - was given it for my birthday so can't say what it cost, but it was from Aldi so not lots I imagine.

I've heard that they work best when just over half full, so that might be a consideration, as might freezer space.

I found [[http://www.lakeland.co.uk/slow-cookers-book/F/C/cooking-baking/C/cooking-baking-cookery-books/prod uct/13240 this cookbook[[ helpful - Lakeland do another one that also looked good and was slightly cheaper, but leafing through it I thought its recipes were less contemporary.

As others have said, they are useful for making basics (stock, sauces) as well as the obvious stews, soups etc.

thereistheball Mon 07-Sep-09 14:16:45

oops, sorry about that link - am using a French keyboard configured as a UK one, so all the keys do different things than they say they do. Should have previewed it!

coveredinsnot Tue 08-Sep-09 20:09:36

Thanks for all your replies. Have ordered one from Amazon now, although can't remember which one! Was about £20. Plus a cook book... Can't wait!

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