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Old Baking Powder

(16 Posts)
Solo Tue 26-May-20 18:25:35

I've been baking a type of soda bread (beer and soda water) but, I've now only got out of date baking powder left which I used yesterday. The bread rose but not as much as usual. Does anyone know if I can use a bit more to get it rising higher or will that not make any difference/make it taste nasty? I don't really want to waste flour by trying it out and it not working. If anyone is in the know, I'd be grateful. Also, I do have fresh yeast in the fridge if I can use that? I don't want to have to knead the dough though.
Thanks!

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Myshitisreal Wed 27-May-20 03:44:05

Do you have bicarb and cream of tartar to make your own baking powder????

Myshitisreal Wed 27-May-20 03:46:05

I'm going to assume it's not Irish soda bread....

Don't think yeast would work.

Could you find a different recipe with ingredients you do have https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/simple-soda-bread

BikeRunSki Wed 27-May-20 06:38:26

Soda (bicarb, baking powder, soda water) bread is denser than bread raised with yeast anyway. Using more baking powder will eventually make the dough really salty and weird. Fresh yeast will work in a recipe designed for it, but you will need to knead it.

KittenVsBox Wed 27-May-20 06:59:36

I wouldnt substitute baking powder for Bicarb. They are different things.

You can find no kneed bread (with yeast), and no kneed beer bread recipies online.

ErrolTheDragon Wed 27-May-20 07:12:21

I'd guess your baking powder has got slightly damp which has allowed some of its chemical reaction to occur already. Using more will, as a PP said, make your bread taste 'salty and weird' - the reaction of acid+base forms a salt (in chemical terms) but it's not NaCl so too much would taste odd not like if you'd put too much ordinary salt in it.

The bbc recipe above works with bicarbonate of soda because the acid to cause the reaction comes from the lemon juice. So if you've got bicarb and lemons you could try that. Or as others have suggested make yeast bread - I've never tried a no-knead recipe but I've seen them recommended elsewhere so I'm sure you can find some.

Solo Thu 28-May-20 19:13:04

Replies!! Thank you for the advice, everyone.

I'm going to have to try to make a 'proper' loaf and knead it, I think. Physically, that won't be easy for me but, it'd be a shame to waste the fresh yeast I have.

I'm loving this new-found beer bread; it's so tasty but, I can't make sandwiches with it smile , and no Myshitisreal it isn't Irish soda bread. I'm going to have a look at your link now. Also, I do have cream of tartar but, the recipe I found to make my own baking powder said I also needed arrowroot so, i discounted it.

OP’s posts: |
Solo Thu 28-May-20 19:15:31

Myshitisreal

I'm going to assume it's not Irish soda bread....

Don't think yeast would work.

Could you find a different recipe with ingredients you do have www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/simple-soda-bread

Great recipe - will be trying that one. Thank you.

OP’s posts: |
BikeRunSki Thu 28-May-20 20:22:44

Baking powder is 2 parts cream of tartar tk 1 part bicarb.
Add 2 tsps of the mix to 6 oz plain flour to make SR.

I was taught to bake by my aunt who only ever bought C o T, bicarb and plain flour and mixed up what she needed accordingly.

I’ve only ever used arrowroot as a thickener.

Solo Thu 28-May-20 20:49:18

Thanks BRS (nice to see you smile)

OP’s posts: |
ErrolTheDragon Fri 29-May-20 00:06:27

According to the bbc good food site, bought baking powder contain a 'filler' to absorb moisture - this will be to reduce the tendency of the acid and base to react in the tub rather than in your bread.grinI'd guess that's what the arrowroot was for but that if would only be needed if you wanted to make up a quantity to keep rather than using it straight away.

It gives the proportions:

To make baking powder, combine half a teaspoon of cream of tartar and a quarter teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda. This provides the equivalent of one teaspoon of baking powder.
To make self-raising flour add two teaspoon (or equivalent homemade) to 150g plain flour.

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/glossary/baking-powder

BikeRunSki Sun 31-May-20 15:55:08

Ooh @Solo, do I “know” you? I don’t recognise your name. Have you name changed? 👋

Solo Sun 31-May-20 21:50:57

@BikeRunSki nothing more than we have 'conversed' on threads over the years, I think. No name changes. Been Solo since joining in 2004. Don't really post much these days. Sorry if I confused you smile

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Solo Sun 31-May-20 21:52:09

Thanks for that info ErrolTheDragon it's good to know.

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BikeRunSki Sun 31-May-20 22:04:43

Ah. Well hi @Solo! Nice to see you, You’ve been here even longer than me!

You also have the same name as my favourite Indian restaurant !

Solo Sun 31-May-20 22:53:03

grin I'm flattered! Indian is my favourite food I'm half Indian too!!

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