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I need help making GRAVY

(16 Posts)
posey Fri 26-Aug-11 19:11:39

i'm not a bad cook but am really rubbish at gravy. It tends to be very hit and miss how it turns out.
We're having friends round for Sunday lunch and I'm doing roast chicken. I would really appreciate a fail-safe method for making gravy, using meat juices, stock etc, properly, in the roasting tin.

Please please someone help!

franke Fri 26-Aug-11 19:15:12

A better cook than me will be along to tell you how to do it. But I recommend adding a lug of Marsala to deglaze the pan - it's a bit Nigella but it does give a nice flavour to my very hit and miss gravy.

BecauseImWorthIt Fri 26-Aug-11 19:15:51

This is what I would do:

When the chicken is cooked, lift it out and onto a board that you're going to carve it on. Cover it with foil to keep it warm.

Put the roasting tin on to the hob over a medium heat and then add a generous tablespoon of plain flour to the juices. Stir, and try and get as many of the lumps out as you can as it thickens.

Once it's really thick, add whatever liquid you have to hand, ladle by ladle, till it's the consistency you prefer. Ideally you should add the water from the veg you've been cooking. You can also add some white wine/red wine/port/lemon juice (as appropriate/to hand). I sometimes add a splash of soy sauce and/or Worcestershire sauce to give a bit of extra flavour as well as colour.

Taste it, and then season appropriately.

Stir constantly so that it isn't lumpy. You may find that there are still some lumps, in which case, use a whisk to stir it or sieve it into your gravy boat.

Good luck!

nancy75 Fri 26-Aug-11 19:17:23

I always use a jamie oliver recipe - you put carrot onion and celery under the chicken while its cooking, at the end take the chicken off, mash up the veg and add abit of flour and some stock, heat the tin on the hob, giving it all a mix and then put it all through a sieve.
I like quite strong gravy so when using doing chicken i usually add an oxo cube and red wine

posey Fri 26-Aug-11 19:27:11

That's really helpful, thank you.
BecauseI'mWorthIt that method looks just the business! Can I ask, do you remove any of the fat from the roasting tin first or just use everything?
frankie and Nancy those ideas both sound delicious. The more flavour the better!

ColdSancerre Fri 26-Aug-11 19:28:21

This thread is making me crave roast chicken.

posey Fri 26-Aug-11 19:28:22

Also meant to ask, I have some chicken stock in the freezer. Can I use that? With some veg water as well?

ColdSancerre Fri 26-Aug-11 19:30:13

Yes I use chicken stock as the liquid in my chicken gravy. Defrost first obviously. I do the same as BIWI but use chicken stock (always have loads of homemade in the freezer) instead of veg water.

I would say exactly as BIWI has and in answer to your chicken stock question, absolutely use it.

BecauseImWorthIt Fri 26-Aug-11 19:31:52

I don't tip the fat out - that's what helps make the gravy so tasty!

BecauseImWorthIt Fri 26-Aug-11 19:32:34

And to be honest there really isn't much fat on a chicken - it's not like when you roast a big piece of beef or lamb.

pointydog Fri 26-Aug-11 19:34:49

I do the BIWI method. Straightforward, no faffing.

Catsmamma Fri 26-Aug-11 19:36:06

tip the fat out of the pan, leave a little in there.

deglaze pan with wine/cider/sherry/vermouth and really get those bits off the bottom of the pan

oxo cube+water, or chicken stock, or veg water

thicken with cornflour and boil well

check for seasoning. plenty of S&P and maybe a squizz of lemon, or sometimes something sweet, like redcurrant/cranberry jelly can work.

posey Fri 26-Aug-11 19:37:34

Brilliant, thank you all. Will come back and let you know how I get on smile

Maryz Fri 26-Aug-11 19:43:13

I do almost exactly what BIWI does, and I find the most important thing is the juice you add - so make sure you have vegetable juice. Something strong like carrots or broccoli will give nice but not too salty veg stock to use.

The only thing I do slightly differently is that I pour the juices from the pan into a glass jug and let it separate. I use a few tablespoons of the fat from the top of the jug to mix with the flour, and try to chuck out the rest of the fat if it is a really fatty chicken, and only use the proper juice. If it is a lovely free-range chicken you probably won't need to do this.

timmyinatizzy Fri 26-Aug-11 19:55:19

To stop it going too lumpy, mix the cornflour or flour with a little water first then add gradually to the pan and keep whisking until it's been absorbed.

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