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Street dance class?

(12 Posts)
zsazsa468 Sat 18-Feb-17 17:30:47

I was just wondering if anyone could explain to me what street dancing classes involve.

My 3 year old daughter is into throwing herself around and has been trying to teach herself somersaults and cartwheels. She currently does ballet and musical theatre.

I'm on maternity leave right now so really want to get into a good routine with my children's activities before I go back to work and decide what hours I can do. Ideally I want them in classes that they can grow with, so that there is room to progress if this is what they choose to do,

I wanted my daughter to do gymnastics, but after looking into it the expense and commitment as time went on would be too much for us.

I then looked into dance acro, which actually would suit us much better but the 3 that I found are a bit far away. I don't drive and the walk after getting the bus part way is too far.

So now I thinking maybe street dancing would be a good comprise?

At the minute she really enjoys doing her ballet although it's a more structured kind of dance. Musical theatre gives her a lot of freedom in moving around her space. I was thinking acro would have gone together with these classes perfectly but we would have so much trouble getting there that I don't think our attendance rate would be good and not fair on dd if she's missing out on building up their routines.

Or any ideas what else would be good to try?

dodobookends Sun 19-Feb-17 00:19:50

Well, she's only 3 so she doesn't need to be doing a lot of different dance styles really - too much would be counter-productive and she wouldn't learn any of them properly, the techniques are too different. If she likes somersaults and cartwheels, she'd be better off in gym rather than street.

At her age she just needs to be enjoying herself and moving about, exploring what her body can do and learning how to join in, and listen to what the teacher is asking her to do. Why not let her try gymnastics for a while, or swimming lessons?

Most kids start different activities, do them for fun, and probably give up after a year or two or want to try something different. You don't have to commit yourselves to years of daily training just yet!

You mention getting your dc's into a routine of different classes before you go back to work. The class times and days will be changing fairly often as they get older anyway, so you will need a certain amount of flexibility as there's bound to be timetable clashes.

zsazsa468 Sun 19-Feb-17 01:31:39

Unfortunetly the gym classes here on average are £20 a session which I really can't afford. It's a shame though as it would really suit here. Right now she really loves her two classes she has so I can't stop them for something she hasn't tried yet. I have also looked into cheerleading but they don't do that around here.

Although as there are long waiting lists, , as in the waiting list has a waiting list, maybe I should put her name down and see what happens when they come up. I've already had to put her name down fron Rainbows and Beavers as the lists for them are just as bad and I'm sure she'll be asking to go to one of those clubs ar some point.

Swimming is too difficult for me to get to via public transport, although the primary schools here have their own swimming pools so she will get lessons later on.

I see where you are coming from about OK many different dance styles, it was just a idea of what we could do instead of gym. Really not sure what to do now.

I feel as as she's very active that she could do another class of some kind at this point. Would maybe a karate type one be good?

dodobookends Sun 19-Feb-17 11:21:59

Perhaps you could talk to other parents and find out what else is available locally.

skerrywind Fri 24-Feb-17 07:03:10

Many children are naturally active- and although some structured activity is fine, they need time simply to be kids.
At this age my kids were running about and exploring outdoors, getting muddy, throwing sticks in streams, climbing, running on the beach, running up hills.
Unstructured activity is important too.

WhoKn0wsWhereTheTimeG0es Fri 24-Feb-17 07:11:20

Trampolining? My two used to go to toddler trampolining until they started school.

Everything does change once they reach school age though, mainly timewise as most classes for pre-schoolers round here are during the school day then obviously they have to change to after school or weekends. Also with the children's interests, what their friends do etc. I'd be looking at how work days/hours fit with pre-school and school rather than clubs which come and go if I were you.

Zodlebud Fri 24-Feb-17 17:32:15

What about going totally off-piste and trying something other than dance? My four year old daughter does ballet, street dance, football and tennis. Both the sports are great for hurtling around and at that age are based on games which build skills.

I would also add that three is quite young to do a lot of activities, particularly when you have more than one child. My life is spent shuttling kids around. Don't feel you have to "replace" gymnastics. You could just wait and see what she fancies in a couple of years.

As an ex dancer I would go with acro as opposed to gymnastics too. They are very different in style.

zsazsa468 Sat 25-Feb-17 00:31:42

Thanks everyone for the replies, a lot to think about!

I did manage to find a dance acro class that we could get to, but as she's been working on a ballet show I was going to let her finish that and then probably drop that one.

Yes I am having a hard time getting a balance right.

Originally we were just doing one ballet class a week which the plan was for her to carry on for a while but that place shut down at short notice. That coupled with her starting pre school and the new baby arriving and a lot of personal situations going on got us now to this point where I haven't been able to think things through as much as I would have liked to.

Around here from 6 months the children seem to be in structure extra curricular classes 4 to 5 times a week! I know a few people that attend 2 different classes a day.

So I was wondering what you all thought of this schedule we have for the week at the moment.

Monday Pre School All Day
Tuesday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops/play date
Wednesday Pre School All Day, Dance including acro 1 hour
Thursday Morning free park/soft play/garden/shops Afternoon Ballet 1 hour
Friday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops/play date
Saturday Morning Musical Theatre 1 hour followed by library Afternoon Free, park/soft play/garden/shops
Sunday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops visit family

As its starting to warm up now we'll be doing monthly 'big' trips to the farm/zoo/shows etc and a couple of caravan holidays.

Thanks everyone for the replies, a lot to think about!

I did manage to find a dance acro class that we could get to, but as she's been working on a ballet show I was going to let her finish that and then probably drop that one.

Yes I am having a hard time getting a balance right. Originally we were just doing one ballet class a week which the plan was for her to carry on for a while but that place shut down at short notice. That coupled with her starting pre school and the new baby arriving and a lot of personal situations going on got us now to this point where I haven't been able to think things through as much as I would have liked to.

We ended up with our Thursday Ballet class just because it's the local all the children go too and to replace her old class quickly rather than me looking into what they actually offer in terms of progression and the range of opportunities. For example exam boards, work experience, costume designing, set designing.

So I was wondering what you all thought of this schedule we have for the week at the moment.

Monday Pre School All Day
Tuesday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops/play date
Wednesday Pre School All Day, Dance including acro 1 hour
Thursday Morning free park/soft play/garden/shops Afternoon Ballet 1 hour
Friday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops/play date
Saturday Morning Musical Theatre 1 hour followed by library Afternoon Free, park/soft play/garden/shops
Sunday Free day, park/soft play/garden/shops visit family

As its starting to warm up now we'll be doing monthly 'big' trips to the farm/zoo/shows etc and a couple of caravan holidays.

Zodlebug could you please share some of your favourite experiences as a young dance and what were the worst bits. I'm really not a pushy mum, if dd doesn't want to dance, gives up classes later on or not want to do exams that's fine. However I do really want her somewhere that will give her as much opportunity and support as possible her if she wants to pursue something in the field (as I've said above costume designing maybe might come from this or teaching).

Thanks again for the help.

zsazsa468 Sat 25-Feb-17 00:32:59

Sorry, not sure why it posted half my message twice!

taxi4ballet Sat 25-Feb-17 09:42:21

zsazsa that sounds fine, plenty to be getting on with. There is a element of "my dc does every activity under the sun" competitiveness among some parents so be wary of that, and try not to fall into the trap!

I hope you don't mind me saying, but perhaps you might be slightly over-thinking your dd's possible future career prospects, she's still little, and is just as likely to be enthused by outdoor walks and become a botanist as she is to become a dancer smile

Only a tiny proportion of dc's who start dance classes will end up taking it seriously enough to think of making a career of it, and of those, only a fraction will have the ability and unswerving dedication to turn that dream into a reality.

zsazsa468 Sat 25-Feb-17 13:27:57

Just worried now that the 3 classes are too much as I only planned on 2 and that there's not enough unstructured play.

100% guilty of over thinking! It doesn't help that we've got a dance teacher and a professional dancer in the family so I'm more aware of what hobbies can turn into. Although of the two I'd rather teacher than professional dance if dd wants to do something as I know from my cousin everything she's been through to get to a good place in her professional dance career.

But if dd wants to drop dancing completely at whatever I'd be fine with that too. I just want her to be in the right place that has opportunities and support that she can take them up on if she chooses to.

I kind of watch dd to see what she's into and then try and see what I can do to support that, for example she really likes playing at being a Dr and as I have a lot of medical appointments so loves know what's going on and taking part in my check up! So already got the idea to get her into St John's ambulance if she's still into all that when she's older.

Think I have too much time on my hands during maternity! Once I'm back at work I'll have things to occupy my mind then to over think everything

Zodlebud Sat 25-Feb-17 16:09:34

I loved my dance classes until I became a teenager and then it kind of took over my life a bit. I was in the studio three nights a week plus most of Saturday and then festivals on Sundays. Now in my 40s I kind of feel a bit like I didn't take advantage of everything in my teenage years.

To be honest, ballet is the only dance element where it pays to start young. Many street dancers don't start until they are much older as it requires a lot of strength - some Zoonation dancers only started in their teens!

My worry is that age three she could have too much dance in her life doing three different disciplines. My rule of thumb is if they don't ask to do it then don't sign them up (the only exception being swimming lessons!!). Once they start school then they will hear of all these other wonderful hobbies they can't possibly live without from their friends and before you know it every night is taken up with something!!!!

I wouldn't let what others are doing guide you. Some kids are actually overscheduled and what they really need is to spend an hour and a half on the sofa watching a movie every now and again. Don't underestimate the benefits of just doing nothing and not having any plans.

I personally would just keep things as they are at present and see what she wants to do in a couple of years time when your baby is older. But then again, I'm the mum who doesn't "do" after school play dates. School holidays - bring it on - but after school when the kids are tired doesn't work for me. Sorry kids!!

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