Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

Any tips for creaky old sash windows?

(9 Posts)
AmIWhatAndWhy Fri 03-Oct-08 17:07:08

DP was insisting we get double glazing (how very dare he) but we are in a conservation area so can't replace them anyway (yey)

But with the cold turn this week I've really noticed how draughty they are.

We always put up thick curtains over our plantation shutters in the winter, but it doesn't help during the day.

I've looked into restoration but it costs a fortune. Is there anything we can do about them?

spicemonster Fri 03-Oct-08 17:11:17

Folded up bits of newspaper shoved in the cracks? Or you can get that plasticy stuff that you attach with a hairdryer to the frame. It's pretty ugly but if you've got plantation shutters, you won't notice it really. You can't open the windows when it's on but shouldn't imagine you'd want to in this weather!

AmIWhatAndWhy Fri 03-Oct-08 17:20:24

Thanks I will look into the plastic stuff, any idea what it's called?

We have two velux windows anyway so can open them if ever needs be.

yomellamoHelly Fri 03-Oct-08 17:36:19

How diy minded are you? Ours were a lot cheaper to do than I'd imagined.
We had ours overhauled this summer and they are LOADS better. The beads were removed and draught-proof seals put against the partition beads and down the sides of the beads that were replaced closer to the windows (so they don't rattle at all anymore). I do think you could do it yourself if you are brave enough, though it would probably take longer than it did him. They've got better locks on them too now which hold them much more securely, again minimising the rattle.
Took the carpenter a day a window for bay and double bedroom window and then another day and a half for remaining 3 single windows (roughly - he's a methodical worker). He charged £220 a day plus the cost of the beads, seals and locks. (Did other work too - some of the sashes and rails were rotten.)
When my dh was a student his parents put a plastic covering across the window frame and hair-dried it until it went tight. Didn't last longer than a couple of months, but did the trick. Otherwise secondary glazing?

spicemonster Fri 03-Oct-08 20:13:18

here is the stuff

www.focusdiy.co.uk/invt/119351

notcitrus Sat 04-Oct-08 20:24:51

we got quoted some extortionate sum for refurb and double glazing of wooden sash windows.
We got really unobtrusive secondary glazing instead, plus an overhaul of the windows. the secondary glazing is excellent at keeping heat in.

nannyL Sun 05-Oct-08 13:51:52

i just bought that window film stuff from the link but from B&Q

that was for 6m squared

it was £2.43 (not £6.99 smile)

littlefrog Mon 20-Oct-08 15:28:58

another thought, if the air leaks are coming up from between the windows (where they join) make some kind of a 'snake' and lie it along there, to reduce the draught. Cheap and utterly reversible.

Pannacotta Mon 20-Oct-08 15:32:54

I'd suggest either secondary glazing which is good but ugle (though ok/unobtrusive) if you ahve shutters and/or getting more quotes for having them refurbished.
We did this in our previous house (refurb)and it really worked and wasn't too pricey. Local joiners are often well priced.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now