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Not being paid for increased hours

(4 Posts)
poorly Fri 17-Jul-09 10:48:19

At the beginning of May I took on a promotion that meant increasing my hours from 40% to 70% of full time.

The large organisation I work for is in turmoil because of the economic crisis and this is a newly created role which is designed to help get us out of it. I was told there would be no pay rise, despite the promotion because of the financial situation, which I accepted because I was told this was across the board and also because I really want to do the job.

However, I am still not getting paid for the increased hours, as far as I know because of admin cock ups, but starting to worry there may be more to it. I have also heard that others are getting payrises.

My new boss goes on hols for 3 weeks at the end of today (pay day) so it it doesn't get sorted today, I won't be paid next month either. I am off sick today (have been horribly ill all week) but was thinking of sending the following email to my new boss.

Good morning X,

I'm sorry to do this when you're trying to get away for your holidays, but I was very disappointed not to have been paid properly again this month.

I am owed around £150 in expenses (a lot when your pay packet is around £1000 a month) because I still don't have a business card. I am putting twice as much petrol in my car as I was, although obviously not this week - every cloud has a silver lining! I also don't yet have a blackberry or lap top, which doesn't help efficiency.

I expected to face a number of challenges when taking on a new job/promotion, I didn't expect financial hardship to be one of them.

I am becoming concerned that there is a problem I'm not being told about. I know there are people who didn't like the part-time arrangement and over the next few weeks my short hours will become more pronounced, not helped by my absence this week, I appreciate. I also have a horrible feeling there could be an objection because head count is being increased, even though the job was filled part-time.

On top of that, two different people have told me that they have been offered pay rises, above the bottom of the scale, to take on new jobs in the last 6 weeks. I am beginning to feel like a mug.

What's going on X?

Poorly

Boss is very senior in the organisation, but I know him well, having been his right hand many years ago, when he got his first managerial job. What do you think?

tegid Fri 17-Jul-09 13:42:57

I think that there are a few issues that you're trying to raise there - probably too many for one email.

Maybe cut it back a bit and just focus on the pay issue:

Good morning X,

I'm sorry to do this when you're trying to get away for your holidays, but I was very disappointed not to have been paid properly again this month.

In addition, I am owed around £150 in expenses as I'm waiting for my business.

Can you let me know when these are likely to be sorted?

Thanks

- Basically, if they've agreed to pay you pro-rata for the additional hours, they'll have to pay you for them. If there's a problem that he's not telling you about, he's not likely to tell you about it, so stick to the facts.

The other issues can wait until he gets back from holiday and you can have a proper discussion with him.

Hope this helps.

flowerybeanbag Fri 17-Jul-09 19:50:31

I think if your boss is off for 3 weeks you need to send a formal email to his boss copied to HR and/or whoever is responsible for payroll. Keep it short and factual just stating that you started your new job on x date, which although it involved no payrise did involve an increase in hours which increased your actual pay from xxx to xxx, however to date your pay has not been increased to reflect the extra hours you are doing, can he/she please ensure this is rectified with immediate effect. Something along those lines.

Once it's been more than two months, your immediate boss is no longer good enough, you need his boss and whoever is responsible for paying you.

annh Fri 17-Jul-09 22:44:51

When your employers said there was no pay rise involved, are you sure they meant they were going to increase your salary pro-rata to reflect the increased hours and not that there was no increase at all (unlikely as that may seem)? Do you have anything in writing confirming the new salary?

I assume you've already sent the email so this is probably academic but I agree with Flowery that it needs to be more formal. Although you say you know/knew the boss well, the problem may not lie with him and he may wish to forward the email on further. Focus on the main issue of pay and expenses not being forthcoming, only mention the laptop and blackberry if lack of these items is severely affecting your ability to do the job. Don't speculate on why you may not be getting paid or rumours that other people are getting payrises.

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