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Pregnancy and Resignation, any advice?

(18 Posts)
Baja Sun 12-Oct-08 19:21:46

I have been trying to get pregnant for a while, and thinking about resigning to aid that happening, mostly because my ds has started school and I am missing out on his life for a job that's turned sour, and the job is stressful and thankless. Just this week I discovered I am pregnant, which is great, and now i'm wondering what would happen if I resigned, but was pregnant, and because my resignation period is long, i would trigger my maternity leave during the period. Has anyone had experience of this and know how employers tend to deal with that scenario. There are redundancies being made currently, and I did think to offer myself up at the same time as letting them know I am pregnant. They are not making redundancies at my level currently.Any advice would be appreciated, thanks.

BlueBumedFly Sun 12-Oct-08 19:40:42

I am not sure on this one as maternity law is so complicated. I would go and see you local citizens advice burea if I were you and then go in armed with the right info.

Congrats on the pregnancy and very best wishes xxx

BeheadedHereNow Sun 12-Oct-08 21:10:31

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

TrippingTheLightFanjTastic Sun 12-Oct-08 21:14:23

If you would have to stay at work until mat leave (earliest 29 weeks?) anyway due to notice period then why resign? Stay at work until your mat leave then leave and tell them you're not returning afterwards. That way you get the mat pay.

BeheadedHereNow Sun 12-Oct-08 21:27:45

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

lou031205 Sun 12-Oct-08 21:27:59

You would qualify for Maternity Allowance any way even if you left work now.

If you stay until week 25 of pregnancy, you will qualify for SMP, which you can choose to take when you want to up till birth, even if you leave work after that.

If you have an Occupational Maternity Leave policy, you need to check it carefully to see what you need to do to qualify.

How long is your resignation period?

Baja Sun 12-Oct-08 23:38:30

Thanks so much for all the responses. I have a 6month notice period, and I think that you can't initiate SMP till 11wks prior to the due date (which i haven't got from the doc yet as still in shock). Like BeheadedHereNow's DP, I think that I should just leave and be done with it, I am sure I can get someone to replace me quickly and go, it just seems crazy in one way to loose the money, but the best decision in another to keep sanity! If I say, I'm pregnant, and want to offer myself up for vol red, I think they can't muck me around, but I'm not so sure... x

ChicPea Sun 12-Oct-08 23:50:02

Congratulations on your pregnancy. I would ring acas on 0845 747 4 747 for their advice. good luck

Baja Mon 13-Oct-08 07:45:57

Thanks Chicpea, I think I will do that. I have come at this question the wrong way, I think what I am really trying to find out is if I resign, do i still have maternity rights. So I'll ask them that and see what they say. I'll post my feedback for future ref. x

flowerybeanbag Mon 13-Oct-08 08:53:45

As long as you are still employed at 15 weeks before (even though you can't start leave until 11 weeks before), you will get your basic statutory entitlements. If there is an enhanced scheme you'd be unlikely to get that, check the terms and conditions.

I wouldn't resign unless you have to, or unless a very favourable redundancy package is being offered.

You can start maternity leave at 11 weeks, and resign with your normal notice period if you don't want to go back after a year, but that leaves your options open, plus also makes sure you get your benefits including holiday for the duration of your maternity leave. If you resign, you won't get any of that.

Baja Mon 13-Oct-08 18:01:29

Thanks for that last one Flowerybeanbag, it's as I suspected. I'll have to work out if it's worth going through the work financially or not. The company policy has to be paid back if you don't return so that is not such a loss, especially as it's very little on top.
If i understand you right, and please forgive me my grey cells are dimishing day by day, you're saying that so long as I remain in work up till and including the 15th wk prior to the birth I'll get the full SMP entitlement, even if i resign after that date?
That's interesting. Thank you.

flowerybeanbag Mon 13-Oct-08 18:05:22

yep. You can't start mat leave until 11 weeks before but even if you leave 14 weeks before, you still get your pay.

Baja Mon 13-Oct-08 18:17:45

But the moment I quit i loose any hol entitlement, but retain hol i've accrued during the period before? x

flowerybeanbag Mon 13-Oct-08 18:58:00

yes. If you leave employment you lose all other benefits for the duration of your maternity leave but you still get SMP.

If you don't resign, you will continue to accrue holiday throughout your mat leave, and if you don't return afterwards, they can and will pay it to you in a lump at the end. 25 days or so holiday pay is quite a lot, might well be worth not resigning...

Baja Mon 13-Oct-08 20:50:01

Flowerybeanbag, when you say 'in employment' you're saying prior to notice being given, is that right? Doing the calculations, if i resigned this friday, notified them of my pregnancy end of dec (3months) the end of the notice period and the 11th prior to birth overlap by 1wk. Would that mean they'd have to honour SMP? I'm just trying to understand if when you are in your notice period you are not considered in employment, sure you are?x

lou031205 Mon 13-Oct-08 21:58:31

If you hand in your notice, as lonng as that notice period takes you up to week 25 of your pregnancy,which is the 15th prior to birth, you qualify for SMP. But if you stay on, you can't actually take your leave until the 29th week of pregnancy.

flowerybeanbag Mon 13-Oct-08 22:00:38

Yes in your notice period you are in employment. Your last day of employment is your last day of work or holiday.

Baja Mon 13-Oct-08 23:09:56

Thank you all, that answers my questions very thoroughly. Very much appreciate all the info and comments. x

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