Talk

Advanced search

performance issue - no examples?

(9 Posts)
feelingfedup Thu 09-Oct-08 11:59:19

Feeling set up.

Have now been formally told I'm not meeting the standard for a specific type of document.

The objectives and content of the document have been described to me, but I think much of the discription is contradictory, eg, 'providing the reader with all he needs to know to make a decision' and 'keeping document to manageble length'.

The reader might well need more than a quick summary, which means the document is going to be lengthy.

So whatever I do, I am judged wrong - hence failing my performance review.

I have asked for an example of this wonderous document, so I know what I need to do and have been told it does not exist and that I should be clever enough to create it!

Just feel I am being set up to fail, my manager has made it quite clear he wants me out and is now using this process.

What can I do?

OneLieIn Thu 09-Oct-08 12:01:11

You need flowerybeanbag.

I think they have to set you specific goals and help you achieve these once you are on a performance warning.

Sure someone who knows more than me will come along shortly....but yes, your manager does want you out.

flowerybeanbag Thu 09-Oct-08 12:34:40

You shouldn't necessarily be given a perfect example of what you should be doing. However, your manager should be able to point out to you specific examples of what is wrong with what you are doing.

So for example, the first one 'providing reader with all he needs to know to make a decision' - your manager should be able to show you one you've done where you haven't achieved that. So that way you can specifically object to those examples if you don't agree.

You need to make sure your comments and objections about the fairness of the issues being raised is on the record, and need to be able to demonstrate that you are in fact doing what is required.

How has your manager made it clear he wants you out?

If there are a series of issues and comments combined with this performance management that you feel are inappropriate and demonstrate that your manager is trying to get rid of you, you should be collating these with dates, specifics and any evidence you have and considering raising a detailed grievance about it. Call it a pre-emptive strike. If your employer has a grievance being raised by you about unfair performance management and other issues, they are not as likely to go so hastily down the route of disciplining you for poor performance.

If your manager wants to get you out, using performance management is tricky and very lengthy. He'd have to demonstrate reasonable attempts to improve, then would have to give a first warning, with reasonable time to improve, then a second warning, etc etc, it all becomes very arduous. He is more likely to be trying to make a huge pain of himself so that you'll just give up and leave.

Putting in a grievance will make him realise that you are not going to do that.

As well as asking what he has done to make you so convinced he wants you out, I'm also going to ask you why do you think this is? If he wants you out there will be a reason, and understanding what that reason is will help you identify how best to deal with it.

flowerybeanbag Thu 09-Oct-08 12:34:41

You shouldn't necessarily be given a perfect example of what you should be doing. However, your manager should be able to point out to you specific examples of what is wrong with what you are doing.

So for example, the first one 'providing reader with all he needs to know to make a decision' - your manager should be able to show you one you've done where you haven't achieved that. So that way you can specifically object to those examples if you don't agree.

You need to make sure your comments and objections about the fairness of the issues being raised is on the record, and need to be able to demonstrate that you are in fact doing what is required.

How has your manager made it clear he wants you out?

If there are a series of issues and comments combined with this performance management that you feel are inappropriate and demonstrate that your manager is trying to get rid of you, you should be collating these with dates, specifics and any evidence you have and considering raising a detailed grievance about it. Call it a pre-emptive strike. If your employer has a grievance being raised by you about unfair performance management and other issues, they are not as likely to go so hastily down the route of disciplining you for poor performance.

If your manager wants to get you out, using performance management is tricky and very lengthy. He'd have to demonstrate reasonable attempts to improve, then would have to give a first warning, with reasonable time to improve, then a second warning, etc etc, it all becomes very arduous. He is more likely to be trying to make a huge pain of himself so that you'll just give up and leave.

Putting in a grievance will make him realise that you are not going to do that.

As well as asking what he has done to make you so convinced he wants you out, I'm also going to ask you why do you think this is? If he wants you out there will be a reason, and understanding what that reason is will help you identify how best to deal with it.

flowerybeanbag Thu 09-Oct-08 12:34:58

Sorry! blush

feelingfedup Thu 09-Oct-08 13:42:32

Many thanks oneliein and flowerybb.

I had an earlier thread where I explined the saga - flowerybb, you were very helpful then too.

In summary my manager has told me I'm overpaid, and he wants to replace me with consultants (which will cost more!)or a couple of more junior staff.

My feeling is that he does not like being challenged, and I made the mistake of challenging him.

He is new to the organisation, and to be fair he has been bought in to sort out a mess, but I feel he is looking for a scapegoat, hence trying to say I am not up to the job.

He is also a workaholic and wants someone who wants to work evenings and weekends too.

My plan is to demonstrate that I meet the standard and then get a fair appraisal report allowing me to apply for an internal transfer.

The grievance sounds like a possibility, but in reality will I be able to get a transfer to another part of the organisation if I start that process? Will any potential new manager be told about the grievance?

There are 15 seperate points I have been told my documents need to acheive - is it reasonable for me to ask to be shown a document where I've not met the standard for each one and why?

flowerybeanbag Thu 09-Oct-08 13:50:53

Aha, ringing bells now.

Your plan sounds good. Yes ask to be shown where you have not met each of the standards you need to if that is what he is saying. Pointing out what someone is supposedly not doing right is obviously fine, but he needs to be able to give you an example of where you haven't done it right, apart from anything to make sure you are clear about what he means. You can't be expected to put something right if it's not made clear to you what you've done wrong.

If you want an internal transfer I would put the grievance on hold just for now. Go through this performance stuff, demonstrate meeting the started and apply for your transfer.

If he continues to behave inapprorpriately and you find his performance management process is impeding your progress to another part of the organisation, go for it with the grievance.

Whether a potential manager will be told about the grievance depends on lots of things, mainly the internal situation of which I obviously know nothing. Difficult to see how someone could manage you without being aware of a grievance process you are going through, but that doesn't mean they need to know before making a decision about whether to take you on.

feelingfedup Mon 13-Oct-08 12:07:35

Talking to HR about possible grievance - needless to say they would rather not go down that route.

Will let you know what happens.

Thanks for all the advice.

RuthT Tue 14-Oct-08 20:21:55

Feelingfedup . . . what's happened?

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now »

Already registered? Log in with: