As a manager how would you handle this situation?

(15 Posts)
user698732 Sun 18-Apr-21 21:13:38

If a member of staff returned after a long term illness and told you they were not coping with their workload what would you do?

OP’s posts: |
SOLINVICTUS Sun 18-Apr-21 21:17:34

Get it in writing and send it up the line and across to HR.

swapsicles Sun 18-Apr-21 21:18:43

Have a private meeting and ask what they would like to do going forward, Less hours/different dept/anything else.
Depending on their answer and what's feasible within my role and company would be my answer.

HGC2 Sun 18-Apr-21 21:19:22

I’d meet with them to get martins re information on what it is they are not coping with, see the f training or reasonable adjustments are required and take it from there

bunglebee Sun 18-Apr-21 21:19:23

Understand what they mean by "not coping" in more detail. Seek advice from HR and Occupational Health.

Did they have a phased return?

ShinyHatStand Sun 18-Apr-21 21:20:51

Depends entirely on whether I thought their workload was realistic for their current hours

GeorgeandHarold66 Sun 18-Apr-21 21:30:40

Firstly, is the workload reasonable? How do others get on with the same workload?
Also, how was their work before they went off?

Secondly, meet with the staff member and try to work out what could help them EG
A mentor for a few months to help them get back into the swing, dropping to part time, extra training, changing the role slightly.

After that, if supportive measure are put in place and they're still not able to get through the allocated work then you might have to start conversations about if they're in the right job and whether other opportunities might be available in your company that would suit them better.

HercwasanEnemyofEducation Sun 18-Apr-21 21:32:35

Find out what they're finding hard and why. Have a conversation either face to face or on video call.

Back up everything with HR.

flowery Sun 18-Apr-21 21:33:40

Who are you in this scenario OP? If you’d like some advice on your situation the easiest thing to do is say what’s happening and what your concern is.

user698732 Sun 18-Apr-21 21:47:51

flowery

Who are you in this scenario OP? If you’d like some advice on your situation the easiest thing to do is say what’s happening and what your concern is.

I’m the member of staff ‘not coping’
I returned 4 weeks ago on a phased return after 18 months off.
The departments workload has doubled in that time, two staff members have left and no extra staff have been employed.
I suffer with anxiety after my illness and due to COVID have had limited contact with people over the past year so that has added some extra stress. I also find it difficult to concentrate on tasks if there is a lot going on.
I told my manager I was struggling he suggested I got signed off sick again which has knocked my confidence even more.

OP’s posts: |
StripedLeopard Sun 18-Apr-21 21:52:31

I'd talk to the person in priv6 and discuss whether any workplace adjustments might help. I'd think about whether their health problems constituted a disability, point then in the direction of the Employee Assistance Program and discuss whether an occ health report would be helpful

mum2jakie Sun 18-Apr-21 21:54:10

Referral to Occy Health. Dependent on their recommendations, may look to reduce workload if that's feasible.

daisychain01 Mon 19-Apr-21 06:54:18

I would ask your manager to help you with a weekly work plan with a review at the end of each week, so you can agree the priority order of your deliverables and what happens if new tasks get thrown at you over the course of the week.

It sounds like you're getting tasks given to you in an uncontrolled, haphazard way and having to work out the priorities for yourself. Whilst under normal circumstances that may not be a problem, if you're trying to get back on your feet health and work wise you need better support and visibility from your manager, especially if you're having to work remotely.

user698732 Tue 20-Apr-21 21:27:20

daisychain01

I would ask your manager to help you with a weekly work plan with a review at the end of each week, so you can agree the priority order of your deliverables and what happens if new tasks get thrown at you over the course of the week.

It sounds like you're getting tasks given to you in an uncontrolled, haphazard way and having to work out the priorities for yourself. Whilst under normal circumstances that may not be a problem, if you're trying to get back on your feet health and work wise you need better support and visibility from your manager, especially if you're having to work remotely.

Yes it does feel like I am getting jobs given too me in an uncontrolled way and like you say in normal times this wouldn’t be a problem.
Any advice on how to approach my manager about a weekly work planner. He’s new so I’ve only started working with him since I returned and I don’t think he has much faith in me as he told me to get signed off sick 😩

OP’s posts: |
Fargonauts Wed 21-Apr-21 14:27:57

It would depend on the reason for the long term Illness and whether with reasonable adjustments in place you are likely to be able to manage the workload long term or not. Occupational health should help advise on adjustments and HR would give advice on other options like moving to another role within the organisation.

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