Interview score and decision

(25 Posts)
DoingItForTheKid Sun 14-Feb-21 23:56:41

I had an interview and was told all candidates will be asked the same questions.

I had a strong written application and they didn't ask me about things on it.

1. Is it is up to me to try to include these things in my answers?

2. They said they would let me know. Two working days later I haven't heard anything.

Should I assume they have offered it to someone else who is negotiating?

OP’s posts: |
Scarby9 Mon 15-Feb-21 00:07:05

Obviously I don't know what the process is for the job area for which you applied.
However, we would only raise at interview something from your application if it was a concern, unclear or raised questions.

We ask all candidates the same 7 core questions which give the opportunity for them to use examples and draw on previous experiences which they may also have included in their application, as well as anything else they feel is relevant. We want to see how you can use your prior experience in our field and that particular job. We score on relevance of answers, quality of links with previous experience etc.

So yes, for us it is up to you to include what you want to tell us in your answers.

We do give feedback to everyone we interview, whether successful or not.

In future, when someone says they will let you know, I would ask when you will hear.

DoingItForTheKid Mon 15-Feb-21 07:09:08

Thank you. The job is in a school.

When I used to recruit I would ask candidates to talk through their applications.

I guess things have changed nowadays.

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Yellowfiledredfilled Mon 15-Feb-21 09:45:29

Scarby9

Obviously I don't know what the process is for the job area for which you applied.
However, we would only raise at interview something from your application if it was a concern, unclear or raised questions.

We ask all candidates the same 7 core questions which give the opportunity for them to use examples and draw on previous experiences which they may also have included in their application, as well as anything else they feel is relevant. We want to see how you can use your prior experience in our field and that particular job. We score on relevance of answers, quality of links with previous experience etc.

So yes, for us it is up to you to include what you want to tell us in your answers.

We do give feedback to everyone we interview, whether successful or not.

In future, when someone says they will let you know, I would ask when you will hear.

We have the same procedure for the first interview - second interview is more personalised, so someone might ask you about your application then but not necessarily.
Two days to get a reply - it might be that the decision makers are busy with other things. We give written feedback on interviews - to both successful and unsuccessful applicants and that's the part that takes the time - our requirement are complex, that balance between saying something encouraging and useful - and saying something upsetting and pointless - we get one person to check this (he has a particular skill in this area) and that one person is always very busy - that's what causes the delay for us.

unfortunateevents Mon 15-Feb-21 10:10:52

Did you not ask when you would hear? Two working days is no time at all, they may still be interviewing? If it is in a school, it is also half-term now so you may not hear until next week. Also, if the interview process is that they ask all candidates the same questions (common in some areas and certainly education) I wouldn't expect to be asked to talk through my application as well which would take the interview off in a whole variety of different directions, depending on the candidate.

HermioneWeasley Mon 15-Feb-21 11:53:18

This is very normal for public sector. It’s a terrible way to interview

Yellowfiledredfilled Mon 15-Feb-21 12:12:59

HermioneWeasley

This is very normal for public sector. It’s a terrible way to interview

Why do you think it's a terrible way to interview?

HuaShan Mon 15-Feb-21 12:56:39

I work in the public sector and I think it's a fair way to interview. We shortlist strictly on the person specification so candidates are advised to carefully address each point in their personal statement. Then the same questions for each candidate and we mark against model answers.

HermioneWeasley Mon 15-Feb-21 17:28:23

Because it’s not tailored to the individual, not following up on their specific examples and experience.

I have been through it once (for a judicial office role) and thought it was utterly bizarre - everyone asked the same questions with no probing, repetition if you’ve already covered it and no opportunity to talk about your unique experience and skills. There is no way it helped them find the best candidates.

Yellowfiledredfilled Mon 15-Feb-21 17:50:12

HermioneWeasley

Because it’s not tailored to the individual, not following up on their specific examples and experience.

I have been through it once (for a judicial office role) and thought it was utterly bizarre - everyone asked the same questions with no probing, repetition if you’ve already covered it and no opportunity to talk about your unique experience and skills. There is no way it helped them find the best candidates.

There's definitely probing with the ones we do as a first interview - and if you can't fit your unique experience into the questions - which are fairly broad and give ample opportunity for breadth and depth, I'd say you'd be struggling to work for us anyway.

PresentingPercy Mon 15-Feb-21 17:55:07

I have interviewed for senior school staff both as an employee of the LA and as a governor. Whilst we have set (base level) questions we would always include follow up questions and further probing depending on what the candidate says. So it’s not just one question and an answer. The whole point of interviewing is to draw out more from the candidate and explain the less obvious and trains of thought. There is no “Model” answer. The candidate was shortlisted based on criteria and that’s the model. A discussion (and that’s what an interview should be) won’t go the same way with every candidate. Candidates could and should bring more to the table than pre determined model answers.

I agree. Identical questions with no room for discussion and probing don’t get the best candidates. It’s lazy really. And wholly risk averse. Usually adopted where there has not been decent HR snd recruitment input.

DoingItForTheKid Mon 15-Feb-21 18:05:00

I genuinely didn't realise interview formats had changed in this way.

Feel I have missed a life skills memo.

OP’s posts: |
Bandino Mon 15-Feb-21 18:22:41

Once you know, it makes it easier I think. Just make a list of requirements and think of an example where you did that. Have a few spare examples for typical interview questions e.g. when you overcame barriers, worked as part of a team, saw something through. You get points every time they can tick something off. I think it's only public sector that does this. It's meant to be fairer in that they're not recruiting people because they like them better.

Palavah Mon 15-Feb-21 18:31:42

HermioneWeasley

Because it’s not tailored to the individual, not following up on their specific examples and experience.

I have been through it once (for a judicial office role) and thought it was utterly bizarre - everyone asked the same questions with no probing, repetition if you’ve already covered it and no opportunity to talk about your unique experience and skills. There is no way it helped them find the best candidates.

But I know what I'm looking for, so why wouldn't I ask all candidates the same questions about those capabilities/skills to allow me to compare them? The questions begin 'tell me about a time when.. ' or 'how would you go about...'. Every candidate has the opportunity to use their own skills and experience in their answer.

Palavah Mon 15-Feb-21 18:34:29

OP,

Look at the job description. Does it list core skills, capabilities, skills? You will want to prepare an example of each of those and a very popular format for answering is known as STAR - a google search will provide examples.

You should always be able to explain why you want the role and why you think you'd be a good fit.

Scarby9 Mon 15-Feb-21 18:43:19

We do actually probe once we have asked each of the set questions, but we don't prompt. We also tell candidates before the interview (which is only one part of the recruitment process) that we would like them to give us examples from their previous experience. Our final question is 'Is there anything else you would like to tell us that you don't feel you have had the chance to say yet, or any more questions you would like to ask?'
I think that gives everyone a fair chance.

DoingItForTheKid Mon 15-Feb-21 23:22:48

OK, thanks, I think i can better prepare next time.

Very hard to assess positive vibes on Zoom.

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PresentingPercy Mon 15-Feb-21 23:27:44

The reason you should use follow up questions and/or tease out more info is that some people who have excellent skills in many ways might not be eloquent and have their technique at interview. Especially people who are not the best communicators but are great at something where they work pretty much on their own. They might need to learn to be part of a team and actually some very bright people are like this. If you go ahead knowing exactly what you want at interview and you have a narrow line of questioning, some people simply won’t get it and you have not bothered to find anything else out. Therefore you have failed to consider the element of conversation and dialogue that should be part of an interview. You do need to coax shyer people or ones who are not confident. Arrogant interviewers need training.

PresentingPercy Mon 15-Feb-21 23:29:39

Indeed disabled people might not be suited by a limited interview. This could be discriminatory.

DoingItForTheKid Tue 16-Feb-21 09:30:04

I had a list of 5 things I should mention but in hindsight that should have been c.10 things because I wasn't asked about other things, when I thought they would have.

It's funny because they remembered a date of some recent training which I wrote on my form. I thought this was a really specific thing for them to remember, and it answered one of their questions. So they had read my form in detail. But they didn't raise other things which I thought were more important. Maybe they weren't that interested.

I didn't ask when I would hear as I have always been informed within a day or so and thought that was the norm.

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JassyRadlett Tue 16-Feb-21 09:36:44

So they had read my form in detail. But they didn't raise other things which I thought were more important. Maybe they weren't that interested.

Or maybe they have that information already, because it was on your application, so there’s no need for them to ask again?

I wouldn’t be overly worried about it being two days. Often there is a gap to allow for any concerns/complaints about the interview process, sometimes interviews will be happening over more than one day, sometimes all the paperwork has to go to HR and be processed/approved before an offer can be made...

Namethatuser Tue 16-Feb-21 10:38:50

DoingItForTheKid

I had a list of 5 things I should mention but in hindsight that should have been c.10 things because I wasn't asked about other things, when I thought they would have.

It's funny because they remembered a date of some recent training which I wrote on my form. I thought this was a really specific thing for them to remember, and it answered one of their questions. So they had read my form in detail. But they didn't raise other things which I thought were more important. Maybe they weren't that interested.

I didn't ask when I would hear as I have always been informed within a day or so and thought that was the norm.

My sister to move into our industry - she gave me her cv and the job description to look at. Her CV was very impressive but not for the job she was applying for. I took the job ad and highlighted all the bits they had asked for that she had failed to address in her CV and her covering letter. I was quite surprised by how many requirements she had missed - she is usually very switched on. Her response was that she assumed they would know that someone at her level was very accomplished in all the skills they asked for, so she didn't feel the need to mention them. After she had finished her cv looked radically different and she had a renewed perspective on the importance of certain skills that she had dismissed.
I think she'd have been pretty clueless as to why they weren't interested in all her amazing achievements and only focused on the skills they asked for in the job description had we not chatted.

sm2012 Tue 16-Feb-21 11:58:24

I think in schools it depends what post you've been interviewed for. With teaching posts you generally find out if you've been successful the same day but with other positions will often be longer.

What position was it you were interviewed for op?

DoingItForTheKid Tue 16-Feb-21 12:27:36

It was a niche non-teaching role.

I have received an email from them informing me I was unsuccessful so your comments will be useful another time.

They don't provide feedback (it's private sector).

OP’s posts: |
PresentingPercy Tue 16-Feb-21 13:59:21

Good luck next time. Take it as a learning experience.

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