My manager is sharing details of someone's suspension with lots of people and seems to think this is fine, what do I do?

(27 Posts)
goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 09:14:37

Hi, I work for a small charity in management role. No HR function.

Had a v difficult issue with a p/t member of staff. We are an organisation who works with children and have had to raise several safeguarding issues we have just been made aware of with the LADO.

Staff member now suspended and doesn't know why.

My boss called a meeting of a subgroup, which included this staff member's peers and basically told everybody all the ins and outs of the complaints some of which relate to his home life not anything he's done at work.

I've been saying from the start we need HR expertise on this. He keeps saying it's fine to discuss it this way. He's also given the full details of the complaint to someone outside of our organisation.

I have written my account of what happened so there is a clear record of timeline, contact with LADO etc. Asked boss where this could be saved confidentially and he said it's fine to be put on shared drive and has added it there.

I am deeply concerned over the lack of confidentiality on what is a very serious issue but CEO keeps talking down to me telling me it's all fine. Trustees think he's wonderful and trust that he is dealing with it well. I don't think they will listen to me. What to do?

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goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 09:29:55

Just to say he does keep saying that he's had HR advice and everything is fine so it's really hard to challenge any of this.

I am not an HR expert by any means but it just feels off so wanted to check.

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LolaSmiles Mon 16-Nov-20 09:32:48

It sounds off to me as well, and in my limited experience mishandling a disciplinary or suspension can be grounds to challenge any firing or sanctions.

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 09:38:05

It's also tricky because there was an initial complaint about same person several months ago which CEO dismissed without really looking into.

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Berthatydfil Mon 16-Nov-20 09:41:04

Sounds totally incorrect to me and a possibly a data breach if he is sharing other personal details.

Someonesayroadtrip Mon 16-Nov-20 09:43:52

Massively inappropriate. It could seriously hinder the disciplinary process. Are you this persons manager?

IdblowJonSnow Mon 16-Nov-20 09:44:49

He is completely in the wrong. However I'm not sure what more you can do without putting your own head on the block.
In my experience those at the top don't like having their mistakes pointed out to them even when it's in their best interests- as it would be in this case.

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 09:45:38

Thank you.

I just don't know how to handle this. There are so many organisational problems but he is so controlling. Whenever I raise that we need to be more professional, get legal advice etc he insinuates that I am not coping with stress.

I think this is what he is telling trustees so that they don't believe me.

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goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 09:51:11

IdblowJonSnow

He is completely in the wrong. However I'm not sure what more you can do without putting your own head on the block.
In my experience those at the top don't like having their mistakes pointed out to them even when it's in their best interests- as it would be in this case.


I think I need to leave don't I?

I'm also really concerned that there are personal things I've had to share with him as my line manager and how indiscreet he might be about these.

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AnotherEmma Mon 16-Nov-20 09:51:17

Join a trade union, Unison is a good one.
Then consider how far you are willing to go to challenge your boss (who is clearly in the wrong about this and other issues). Would you write to the trustees about him? Report him to the ICO? Here is their information about whistleblowing:
ico.org.uk/media/report-a-concern/documents/1042550/protection_for_whistle_blowers.pdf

Gazelda Mon 16-Nov-20 09:55:47

I don't think you can leave it. The way he is handling this situation is an indication of how he handles other processes, ie without regard to best practice/legalities.
Do you know any of the trustees well enough to talk with?
Do you have a staff helpline/welfare service?
Can you get a copy of the whistleblowing policy?

AnotherEmma Mon 16-Nov-20 09:57:04

Helpful advice from protect-advice.org.uk/

MrsMiaWallis Mon 16-Nov-20 09:57:39

Honestly? Don't get involved.

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 10:08:30

MrsMiaWallis

Honestly? Don't get involved.


These are my thoughts too

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MrsMiaWallis Mon 16-Nov-20 10:10:44

Absolutely no good will come of it, whatever the posters on mumsnet say! Just stay out of it and quietly look for another job if you don't like the atmosphere.

If he's no longer at the company the boss can say what he likes about him tbh.

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 10:17:52

MrsMiaWallis

Absolutely no good will come of it, whatever the posters on mumsnet say! Just stay out of it and quietly look for another job if you don't like the atmosphere.

If he's no longer at the company the boss can say what he likes about him tbh.


Thank you these are my thoughts too I just need to get the hell away.

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MrsMiaWallis Mon 16-Nov-20 10:32:58

Good luck! Nothing worse than a toxic atmosphere at work.

AwaAnBileYerHeid Mon 16-Nov-20 10:45:23

There is an I'm in HR, AMA thread currently on here, have a look and maybe ask them?

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 12:54:31

AwaAnBileYerHeid

There is an I'm in HR, AMA thread currently on here, have a look and maybe ask them?


Thank you

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AnotherEmma Mon 16-Nov-20 12:56:57

It doesn't take an HR expert to work out that the options are to report him (to the trustees and/or ICO) or resign, or both. Not much else you can do.

Feminist10101 Mon 16-Nov-20 12:59:39

AwaAnBileYerHeid

There is an I'm in HR, AMA thread currently on here, have a look and maybe ask them?

If you read the first post of that thread you’ll see that is not what it is for at all.

OP, I’m in HR (and on that thread) and your boss/organisation could be taken to the cleaners for this. I can’t believe the disciplinary policy doesn’t spell all of this out.

goingovertheshop Mon 16-Nov-20 15:16:57

Thanks feminist10101

I dont think the trustees will listen to me or believe me. He just flannels that he's had HR advice and everything is fine. He's very gaslighty!

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Belleende Tue 17-Nov-20 07:54:03

Hi I work in a large charity and am trustee in a small one.

I think you need an exit plan, you are not working in a safe place and it will come crashing down at some point, you are much better off out of it.

In your shoes I would get a new job sorted, and whistle blow to the charity commission on the way out. The Trustees are on very thin ice. What you are describing is raising so many red flags.

WillSantaBeComingToTown Tue 17-Nov-20 13:36:02

goingovertheshop

It's also tricky because there was an initial complaint about same person several months ago which CEO dismissed without really looking into.

Did you follow safeguarding procedures in that case?
If not you should escalate it /whistleblow now

Daphnise Tue 17-Nov-20 18:09:29

Don't bother with a Union- they won't do anything.

There's nothing wrong with telling everyone who may deal with a person that they are suspended, and that there should be no contact.

The reasons why and details are generally confidential. Despite this a suspension will cause talk- though not often what you describe here.

In your situation if you involve yourself, you can expect much stress, conflict, no support and probably given how poorly things are being done, suspension yourself.

If you are that unhappy, leave when you can.

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