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Part time working problems

(17 Posts)
chestermum2020 Tue 21-Apr-20 19:57:55

Hi MN-ers!
How have people found getting part time jobs? I can't commit to full time with my LO in nursery for two days a week, and am really struggling to find a part time job. I'm finding that jobs aren't what they're advertised to be, and that the application process is really tough - seems unnecessary. Any others in the same boat, or encountering similar problems?

OP’s posts: |
Bloomburger Tue 21-Apr-20 20:03:12

Why would the application for a part time job be any less stringent than a full time job?

HappyBirthdayQueenieMarm Wed 22-Apr-20 01:31:38

Yes so many misleading ads! Any chance you could be self employed? Part time and school term jobs are so rare. Its cheaper for an employer to have someone full time.

chestermum2020 Wed 22-Apr-20 07:30:27

@bloomburger Not saying it should be less stringent, but I applied for jobs like 8-16 hour admin role or PA roles. Being asked for a cover letter, CV, and to fill in a separate application form, then to be asked the same questions when interviewing seems a bit unnecessary. Difficult to do from my phone when I don't have a computer at home either.

OP’s posts: |
PotteringAlong Wed 22-Apr-20 07:32:56

Being asked for a cover letter, CV, and to fill in a separate application form, then to be asked the same questions when interviewing seems a bit unnecessary.

That’s just what job applications are likeconfused

AStarSoBright Wed 22-Apr-20 07:38:37

That's a basic job application. Full time or part time, you're still wanting employment.

HappyBirthdayQueenieMarm Wed 22-Apr-20 07:42:15

The irony! grin
PA and admin roles, part time at that are very rare and competitive. That's why employers can afford to be so picky. A covering letter, literally shows your skills as an Admin!

Some job interviews ask for a presentation!

HappyBirthdayQueenieMarm Wed 22-Apr-20 07:43:32

My point is, while I empathise it is standard really. I was shocked at Tesco's recruitment process and that was for stacking shelves. McDonalds is very hard, too.

catnichols Wed 22-Apr-20 11:00:37

Totally with you HappyBirthdayQueenieMarm - I've also had a terrible experience with Tesco. I'm not too fussed about where I work, but it's so important that I'm able to find a job where they can fit around my availability. I have to care for a relative and it's not always easy to have consistent working hours.

So many job ads never state what days or number of hours they want! Where does everyone look for part-time work?

user1487194234 Wed 22-Apr-20 22:11:38

Everyone I know,apart from teens/students,who are in part time work moved from a full time position with that employer

KatherineJaneway Sun 26-Apr-20 06:16:18

In my experience retailers require a good level of flexibility, so tend not to advertise set hours as they need that flexibility in a lot of roles.

Recruitment process sounds normal.

SnuggyBuggy Sun 26-Apr-20 06:35:40

A lot of job adverts are crap as they can be really vague about essential things like hours of work and location not to mention job description and requirements.

I don't get it, I mean I get that employers don't care about wasting the applicants time but it wastes their own time if they end up interviewing a load of people who can't take the job because it doesn't work for them. Then weeks later they post the same crap advert and get the same thing.

KatherineJaneway Sun 26-Apr-20 07:48:13

I don't get it, I mean I get that employers don't care about wasting the applicants time but it wastes their own time if they end up interviewing a load of people who can't take the job because it doesn't work for them. Then weeks later they post the same crap advert and get the same thing.

To be fair you can get some refusals at offer stage. You are clear all through the process that different rotas need to be worked and flexibility is required. You offer them the job then they say they can only work x, y and z. You say can't help you, these are the hours on offer and they are incredulous. They think because you offered them the job, you will give it to them and meet their demands. Doesn't work like that. We just offered to the next candidate.

SnuggyBuggy Sun 26-Apr-20 07:57:35

But what if there are no candidates because your vague advert has led to the wrong people applying?

An example from my own workplace, they needed someone to do data entry, 5 days a week, from 2 pm to 10 pm. The advert went out with no mention of the time and people applied assuming it would be a 9-5 sort of job. None of the people who turned up for interview were willing or able to do those hours. The people who would have liked an evening job (I can imagine parents where the other parent does an early morning job and picks up kids after school maybe) didn't apply because they probably assumed it was a 9-5 job.

Literally all it would have taken was a sentence with the hours of the job. I think some employers have delusions that there are hoards of people desperate to take any job with them so they don't have to put any effort into their recruitment. It makes way more sense to be clear and upfront about hours, most people do have constraints and lives outside of their jobs.

KatherineJaneway Sun 26-Apr-20 08:12:11

In your example Snuggy, it makes no sense to leave working hours off unless you have a very cautious HR department who worry they'd be challenged over why the hours are set as they are and don't feel they have justification.

DianaT1969 Sun 26-Apr-20 08:25:39

I absolutely agree OP. The quality of recruitment adverts is very poor. I have seen numerous part-time jobs where the days or hours aren't specified at all. It will say part-time job 16 hours per week and no other detail. Wasting everybody's time. Although there are a lot of adverts for recruitment agency staff and I wonder if there is high turn over and they start writing jobs specs from day one.
Also, it's 2020. People are responding from their phones. Deae Recruiters, Drop the cover letter nonsense. It's impossible to format a Word document on a phone. Don't penalise job hunters, who may be SAHMs for not having a pc or laptop at home. They could go back to the 1980s and head off to an internet café.

SnuggyBuggy Sun 26-Apr-20 08:34:02

Maybe that was it. In this case without going into boring detail those hours made sense but there was no reason why they couldn't have split them between 2 people.

They also tried to bring in a night shift that involved full time hours but over 5 days. I remember we kept trying to explain to them that most night shift jobs are condensed hours and no one wants a working pattern like that. Again splitting that role between 2 people doing 2 or 3 days (of which there was some interest and willingness) wasn't good enough, it had to be one person.

Maybe it was because of HR. I just think a lot of employers have very unrealistic expectations of their staff.

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