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Flexible working. Ask at interview or wait?

(23 Posts)
chickaleta Tue 26-Sep-17 18:21:11

Just wanted to get some opinions really.
I'm off for a job interview and I would need to request flexible hours if they offered me the job. I don't think it's horrendous, I'd just be asking for 2 shorter days and 3 longer.
Would you ask this at the interview or wait and see if you get an offer?

purplemunkey Tue 26-Sep-17 18:26:10

Personally I'd wait til offer. Let them choose you first then discuss contract details.

I've discussed flexible working hours for my last two jobs. Both times I brought this up at offer stage.

RunningOutOfCharge Tue 26-Sep-17 18:37:07

I interview at our place and I’d appreciate knowing at the interview

Honestly from the start bodes well with me

chickaleta Wed 27-Sep-17 07:44:36

Thanks for the replies.
I was going to wait for an offer too but I can see your point @RunningOutOfCharge so I think I'll ask in the interview, thanks!

RunningOutOfCharge Wed 27-Sep-17 08:05:34

Good luck with your interview!!

Slartybartfast Wed 27-Sep-17 08:07:16

i would wait for the offer, in case it doesnt materialise after you have asked for flexible working and you blame yourself

do you Have to have flexible working or can you make do without?

NotTheCoolMum Wed 27-Sep-17 08:08:56

Wait for the offer!

You could probe at the interview by asking about fit. Politely enquire if there are diverse working patterns in the team, is flexibility encouraged etc. Make it sound positive though.

shouldaknownbetter Wed 27-Sep-17 09:56:15

Definitely wait for the offer. otherwise it could put them off you or if it's equal between you and someone else, favour them.

Buck3t Wed 27-Sep-17 10:15:31

Wait til offer, but robe like shoulda says. You only have to read this page to see how some employers behave.

SheepyFun Wed 27-Sep-17 10:17:20

It depends how much of a deal breaker it is for you. DH works 4 days a week (so 80%, not condensed hours) in an industry where working part time is very rare. He has been turned down for jobs because he requires this, but he raises it very early on in the recruitment process - the process typically takes 2 days of his time, which he'd rather not waste if the answer is going to be no anyway.

chickaleta Sun 01-Oct-17 07:38:01

Thank you for all the replies. I asked at the interview and they were very receptive and confirmed that other team members do the same.
I said I thought it was best to ask at the interview as I wouldn't be able to take the job otherwise.
I won't know if i got it til next week.

JustMumNowNotMe Sun 01-Oct-17 07:45:59

Why wouldn't you be able to take the job without it? If its fir childten pock ups surely just use a CM/after school club/longer nursery day?! confused

daisychain01 Sun 01-Oct-17 08:11:23

I wouldn't ask at the interview. Keep your powder dry.

They should have a flexible working policy as employees are entitled by law to request flexible working, but you have to have been an employee for at least 16 weeks before you can ask. If you ask any sooner, you may find they decline, with the law on their side and then they'd just keep finding reasons to say no, if they are of that mindset.

- You need to do it in writing after 16 weeks has elapsed.
- Focus on the effect on the business
- state what you intend to do to mitigate the impact of your proposal
- The company needs to respond, either with an acceptance or if declining, stating their grounds of refusal, based on several standard criteria.

If they are a small company they may process it slightly differently but the approach needs to be along the same lines.

In short, best to get the job, work for the hours they need as per the job advert, then when you've made yourself indispensable smile over the 16 weeks, put in your (strong business focussed ) case.

daisychain01 Sun 01-Oct-17 08:14:27

Sorry I missed your update, good that they are supportive, and if it was a deal breaker you did the right thing for you. My advice still carries as there is risk asking at interview.

Glad it worked out for you!

daisychain01 Sun 01-Oct-17 08:15:37

Did you get the job?

chickaleta Sun 01-Oct-17 09:10:15

@JustMumNowNotMe I wouldn't be able to take the job as it's an hour's commute and even with wraparound care I wouldn't get back in time to pick up the kids.

Loopytiles Sun 01-Oct-17 09:11:28

Wait, as discrimination about this kind of thing is real IMO.

ShotsFired Sun 01-Oct-17 09:34:18

Could you ask in a related way to test the water?

Something like - "who is in the office on a day to day basis" or "what is the office culture like?"

if they are immediately saying "we are all here 9-5 no exceptions", then you have your answer, but if there are people WFH and coming and going all day, its a bit more optimistic.

ShotsFired Sun 01-Oct-17 09:34:57

Agggh this is my second post of today NRTFT, sorry OP!

MaryLancaster Mon 02-Oct-17 12:54:08

Well, here's an example of where it worked.
Looks like it could be worth asking just to see whether you'd be working for a decent employer.
Good luck with the interview!
roseandwillard.com/blogs/journal/why-employers-should-hire-women-with-children

Workingonthemoon Mon 02-Oct-17 17:38:52

If you absokutely can't do the hours they are currently asking then you need to talk to them before/during the interview.

If it's just a preference then raise it at the offer stage but be prepared for them to say no as they advertised it with x hours.

Good luck.

chickaleta Thu 05-Oct-17 07:02:04

Well, they offered me a second interview but I've worked out that even with flexible hours it doesn't really stack up for me because of the commute.
I'm going to withdraw my application today.
I think I would do the same in future as the interviewer who would have been my manager seemed to appreciate the honesty and luckily it wasn't a problem for her.

Workingonthemoon Thu 05-Oct-17 07:58:36

DaisyChain. Sorry to hijack but is that the same for short fixed term contracts?

OP, hopefully something better will come up. X

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