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Salary Pro Rata

(20 Posts)
serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 09:30:27

I've just received my contract which states a different (lower) salary to the one on my offer letter which stated £x pro rata. Surely the pro rata amount is the salary i should be getting as it's already pro rata? Any ideas?

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 09:31:59

I've just received my contract which states a different (lower) salary to the one on my offer letter which stated £x pro rata. Surely the pro rata amount is the salary i should be getting as it's already pro rata? Any ideas?
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SheRaaarghPrincessOfPower Fri 28-Apr-17 09:32:23

Are you part time?

Nellooo Fri 28-Apr-17 09:33:11

No. Most places advertise the full-time salary in the advert then it is reduced to align with the number of hours actually worked.

DrizzleHair Fri 28-Apr-17 09:34:46

I think eg 20k pro rata means the equivalent of 20k but part time, so if 0.6 fte that means you'd actually be paid 12k. The 20k quoted refers to the full time equivalent.

So unfortunately I think you might have misunderstood what pro rata and the accompanying number means.

Scribblegirl Fri 28-Apr-17 09:35:23

If the offer letter said '£25k pro rata' and you've agreed to work 3 days a week, I would assume that would mean £15k per annum.

Where the words 'pro rata' are written after the amount of money, it generally means that the figure given is the not pro-rated amount.

PlaymobilPirate Fri 28-Apr-17 09:36:06

Are you part time? I work 4 days - .8 so I get 80% of the salary advertised

UppityHumpty Fri 28-Apr-17 09:37:43

Pro rata effectively means proportioned depending on hours worked. If full time you will get the full amount, if not it's reduce depending on yout hours. Is this your first part time job? It's a fairly standard way of doing things

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 10:08:06

Thank you all for your replies. I work 36 hours a week 40 weeks a year, term time.

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 10:41:58

I work 36 hours a week, 40 weeks per annum, term time

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 10:45:01

Thanks Nellooo, shouldn't that be then advertised as FTE and I thought that is what it would have said on my offer letter e.g salary is £x FTE not pro rata?

LIZS Fri 28-Apr-17 10:45:02

You would get a prorata holiday allowance on top of 40 working weeks so probably be paid approx 44/52 of the advertised ft salary.

Letseatgrandma Fri 28-Apr-17 10:49:57

When it says, £20k pro rata, that's what you'd be paid if the job was full time hours, full time across the year.

Is it a TA job? They are notorious for sounding ok as a pro rata wage, but when it's broken down, you only end up taking home about £600!

PuddleTrouble Fri 28-Apr-17 10:55:05

So if the salary is stated as £20k and hours are 36 per week - what would the calculation be?
£20k x 36hours/40hours x 40weeks/52weeks?

LIZS Fri 28-Apr-17 11:06:07

It may be that 36 hours is the full working week. Say 8:30 to 15:45.

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 11:54:55

I've done a calculation of £x / 52 weeks x 49.5 weeks and this works out to what they've said my actual salary will be on the contract. but what I didn't understand was that the offer letter stating £x pro rata was the actual salary.

prh47bridge Fri 28-Apr-17 12:14:58

The offer letter and your contract are saying the same thing but in different ways. The offer letter is stating what the salary would be if you were full time and that it will be adjusted for the fact you are not. The contract is stating the salary after adjustment.

flowery Fri 28-Apr-17 12:18:50

They could say FTE or pro rata. If they were putting the actual amount you were going to receive they wouldn't need to put anything else.

scottishdiem Fri 28-Apr-17 12:22:51

Indeed - offers are either £X or £X pro rata (and then clearly state your pro rata hours).

serif1 Fri 28-Apr-17 13:05:02

Thank you all - you've been helpful smile

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