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Flexible working

(15 Posts)
GreenFirefly Wed 22-Feb-17 19:33:03

I currently work part time - 0.5 of full time. Is there any reason why I can't put in a flexible working request to e.g. work from home one day a week or to work flexitime around the hours I currently work?

MrsandMrsSmith Wed 22-Feb-17 19:40:01

You can put in a request but if it doesn't work for the business they don't have to agree to it.

GreenFirefly Wed 22-Feb-17 20:06:40

But they do have to treat it as a statutory flexible working request?

chipsandpeas Wed 22-Feb-17 20:11:26

you have the right to request but your employer can turn the request down if it doesnt suit their needs

CPtart Wed 22-Feb-17 20:31:17

"The needs of the service come first" I was told. (NHS. So I left).

muchovino Wed 22-Feb-17 20:43:47

Agree with others, they will look at whether it fits in with the business sad

GreenFirefly Wed 22-Feb-17 21:13:51

My problem is that I've made the request but I've been told it's not a flexible working request as they don't offer that kind of flexible working, even though it's a type of flexible working as defined on gov.uk. So it's not really being considered, nevermind getting a valid business reason for rejecting it.

muchovino Wed 22-Feb-17 21:25:19

Oh dear, it all sounds a bit complicated. I'n no expert in such matters, do you have anyone you can get advice from or maybe speak to Acas? I hope you get things resolved brew

GreenFirefly Wed 22-Feb-17 21:29:41

My union rep is being very helpful, I just wanted to know we hadn't missed something really obvious - that maybe being part time was all the flexibility available. Though I doubted this as I don't think part time staff can be treated less favourably than full time.
Thanks all.

flossyfloss Wed 22-Feb-17 21:49:24

Yes you're right they have to treat it as a statutory flexible working request as you are asking for a change to your contracted working hours. This is as long as you've worked there at least 26 weeks.

If they don't consider the request they are in breach of legislation

fabulous01 Wed 22-Feb-17 21:58:53

If you are part time you are unlikely to get what you are requesting. Reason is that you will rarely be in office. From a business perspective you are unlikely to get it

However you are really lucky to get what you have as part time decent jobs are gold dust.

Brighteyes27 Wed 22-Feb-17 22:00:12

I applied for this and was turned down due to needs of the business. The arguments they put forward didn't stack up and I argued this with them but they were not up for negotiation or being reasonable. The union rep was as much use as a glass eye.

buttonmoonb4tea Wed 22-Feb-17 22:03:20

I'm the same 0.5 and have put in a flexible working request. This was ignored. Then I requested a change in location. Was then told my request for flexible working would be considered but as I am customer facing would be difficult, which is understandable but I've now had my relocation request refused verbally, nothing in writing. Is this right?

I was relocated to another office 45minutes to an hour away on return from mat leave after a restructure whilst onomatopoeia leave. Is this ok? Can I challenge this? The commute is becoming more and more difficult given hours needed to be in the office and nursery opening hours.

buttonmoonb4tea Wed 22-Feb-17 22:04:08

*whilst on maternity leave

fabulous01 Wed 22-Feb-17 22:20:01

I work in HR senior level for 10 years. Even I don't get flexible working, or part time.
Businesses can do what they want particularly if customer facing
Legislation is there but you have to make complaint to tribunal which now costs money to do so and no guarantees of success
Look at policies, culture and get your comparisons ideally male
Yes you may then get what you want but also you may be next in line for redundancy

My advice. Get a company that supports flexible working. If you are part time try and work what you can as those jobs particularly professional are gold dust so make it work for you. People like me are lurking in background as I want your part time job

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