Calculating redundancy pay

(4 Posts)
beadyboo Mon 21-Nov-16 19:18:30

Last week I was made redundant. I have worked for the same company for 15 years, however after 10 years and 2 kids I went part time. The formula the company uses to calculate my settlement is a function of weekly pay multiplied by number of years served. They are using my current weekly pay. I have argued that the calculation should reflect the 10 years I worked full time and my line manager agreed however the director has vetoed this. The difference is huge to me. Can I get anywhere from a moral / fairness standpoint, or do I just have to accept it. Does anyone know?

HeCantBeSerious Mon 21-Nov-16 19:22:26

Legally, no. Your weekly pay is calculated on a particular date and multiplied by a certain amount depending on age and years work. It makes no difference whether you were PT or FT for those years. Sorry.

flowery Mon 21-Nov-16 19:49:12

You need to think of redundancy pay as being compensation for losing your job. If you think of it that way it makes no sense to calculate it on historical earnings, it needs to be calculated on he weekly pay you are actually losing out on, i.e. your current pay.

Calculating redundancy pay based on average earnings or similar would make no sense. It means most people would get less than their current pay and because everyone's length of service/rate of pay rises would be different, there is no way of calculating an average fairly.

Current earnings actually being lost is the only way to do it.

soupmaker Mon 21-Nov-16 19:58:32

I agree with the PPs. Redundancy payments are subject only to the legal minimums set out in law. You would have no legal case for a payment increase based on your years as a FT employee. I took voluntary redundancy from my part time post at work earlier this year - as has been pointed out it's losing your current salary not the one you had FT.

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