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So is having a foot in the door with the NHS any advantage when it comes to training?

(2 Posts)
JenniferYellowHat1980 Mon 10-Oct-16 22:07:58

I'm going round in circles trying to decide what to do with my life. I've left teaching and just completed an access course to retrain as an AHP. I had an idea of the field I wanted to go into but there are a few different areas of interest.

In spring I secured an assistant post in a different clinical field - one that isn't included in NHS bursary funding so I won't be eligible for funding for a second degree. I was very honest at interview about my plans and was told there was a new qualification route in planning but there were no guarantees of funding or necessarily a post at the end of it. They still offered me the job.

The recruitment process took a long time and I've only been in post a couple of months. Bearing in mind that I need to make an application to UCAS by January I had hoped for some clarification on whether or not there is a training route available to me on the job. I'd prefer to do that than go back to full time undergraduate study miles away from my DCs. I just can't get any answers out of anyone. The training I've already had is very complex and it seems like such a waste that I'm in all likelihood going to end up leaving for a definite qualification route in a different field. I'm doing well, getting on with people but I just feel like I'm being overlooked (though obviously it's very early days).

So is it worth having a foot in the door and waiting it out? I'm going to have to get a uni place sorted for security, I want to get back into a professional role sooner rather than later.

Largemelons Mon 10-Oct-16 22:12:57

I'm not sure which field you are interested in but it definitely helped me and was the only way I could really get my graduate role as a BMS.
I went in as a graduate but worked as an assistant. When my current job was advertised they had over 300 applicants and they only interviewed those with experience in the NHS.

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