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Unfair feedback at work - feeling bullied

(5 Posts)
Carrierpenguin Thu 01-Jan-15 21:44:07

Recently everyone at work received feedback from colleagues. I received some 'informal' feedback from the area sales director (not my boss) that he feels I don't demonstrate a good understanding of the companies business. When I asked my immediate boss for further explanation or examples, she said it's a perception the director has and he gave no examples. Nor was this documented on paper.

Since then I've been given this feedback on paper but again with no examples, I've been told again it's a 'perception'. I asked whether some of my less experienced colleagues have been given this feedback too, but was told it's confidential.

I have some history of problems with this director, I queried the workload sent my way in the past as it seemed unreasonable and more than others had, he told me to work more effectively and not converse with colleagues hmm he also set me up to fail before, when I complained to him about it he said he didn't want to discuss.

As it's a toxic relationship with this bully and I'm due to go on maternity leave soon, should I challenge hid unfair feedback or leave it, knowing that my immediate manager is happy with my performance and hopefully the bully will have moved on by the time I return? He has a history of bullying behaviour but people tend to leave/change departments rather than challenge.

flowery Fri 02-Jan-15 07:56:42

As you describe a "toxic" relationship with "this bully" I'm assuming there's a lot more to it than just some vague feedback you don't agree with and the other couple of problems you mention.

However, just to answer this specific issue, if you've already asked for examples, not received any, and your manager also disagrees with the feedback I wouldn't worry about it too much, just ask for a note to be put on your file that you do not agree with the assessment and were not provided with examples to enable you to address concerns.

If you feel he is bullying you, have you done anything about this? Have you spoken to your manager, or considered raising a grievance?

GlitteryLipgloss Fri 02-Jan-15 11:41:20

I wouldn't challenge it anymore. It becomes a he said she said fiasco. Sounds like he gets off on his ego by making people feel shit about themselves!

Rise above it and do what Flowery says, ask for a note to be put on your file that you and your manager disagree with his comments/feedback and leave it be, his opinion is just that. Makes him feel all important I bet.

Enjoy your new baby x

Carrierpenguin Fri 02-Jan-15 18:41:17

Thank you for your replies! I haven't considered a grievance as I've always wanted to keep my job (ime people who raise grievances seem to end up leaving, perhaps with a pay off but I'd rather keep my job). He is definitely a bully, though probably worse to others than me, I have no easy evidence of this, just hearsay and an obviously poor hr record he has, his immediate staff retention is bad.

I will take your advice and lay low, having disagreed with the comments on paper. Thanks again.

Millerpup Fri 02-Jan-15 21:44:05

I wouldn't leave it ...but then thats me ....
There are signs already that this man is a bully and his comment has left you feeling uncomfortable. Therefore, although i dont think its enough for you to raise a grievance I do think that i would document my own file note and ask HR to place it on my file for future purposes should anymore comments be made.
Any negative feedback should be always be constructive with given opportunities for you to rectify the issue. How can you improve on this "perception" if you don't know which acts of yours have given him this impression?
Your immediate manager should have supported you 100% especially if happy with your performance and shouldn't really have told you what he said.
You have now been made to feel uncomfortable and that is wrong.
Start to keep a record of any other comments actions from this man towards you and hope that he does get moved on by the time you return from ML.

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