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Employment issue

(5 Posts)
Bex89 Sun 07-Apr-13 19:05:20

Hi everyone,

I was hoping to get some advice on where I stand with my rights as a pregnant woman in work. (I am now four and a half months)

My issue is that I work as a supervisor in retail and am on a twelve hour contract although since I started there a year ago I work on average 30 hours plus a week.

I looked at my rotas two days ago and my manager has dramatically cut my hours to around 15 a week (two days) and also taken some shifts away from me. When I confronted her she said that I am pregnant and should be taking it easy, I asked her not to patronise me as If I was struggling with my work load I would say.

What can I do about this and what rights do I have? It's extremely upsetting for me at the moment.

Thanks
Bex.

Oodsigma Sun 07-Apr-13 19:25:49

Is this Bout the time they calculate your maternity pay ?<suspicious>

What are you contracted? Have you any problems they have 'risk assessed ' to limit your hours?

Bex89 Sun 07-Apr-13 19:58:02

Hi, no, no problems. Risk assessment back in January and no issues have come of this, also I believe I will receive statutory maternity pay.
I haven't complained about working and being pregnant at all. So confusing. Thanks for reply.

Oodsigma Sun 07-Apr-13 20:11:06

Taken from here

As a rule of thumb, the earnings taken into account for monthly paid employees are those set out on the last two payslips before the Qualifying Week (which is the 15th week before your Expected Week of Confinement / Childbirth). For weekly paid employees, the last eight payslips before the Qualifying Week are taken into account.

Could this affect your maternity pay if they cut your hours?

hermioneweasley Sun 07-Apr-13 20:11:52

No, they cannot unilaterally reduce your hours and if the reason for it is your pregnancy, then it's unlawful discrimination. I would go back and say you want your hours reinstating and compensation for income lost as a result of their reduction.

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