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Childcare Vouchers - has anyone sucessfullly persuaded an employer to join scheme?

(13 Posts)
mummaberry Wed 06-Jul-11 11:43:13

Finding childcare very expensive and would like to use childcare vouchers - my work has a scheme but my husband's does not - (quite dissapointing considering he works for a charity)

Have suggested he tried to persuade them to join a scheme - has anyone done this successfully? If so, it would be great to know how you went about persuading your employer??

MovingAndScared Wed 06-Jul-11 13:55:38

have a look at the providers sites they have the business case there - it does save the organisation a bit of money as they don't have to pay employer NI on that part of the pay I think

You need to convince them it can be cost neutral. I used to work for a big employer who didn't do them, several of us raised it a management-staff consultative forum, they looked into it and agreed (and they were generally fairly tight on employee benefits, statutary minimum maternity pay for example). Probably need to get a good idea of the percentage of the workforce who would be likely to use the scheme.

HappyMummyOfOne Wed 06-Jul-11 18:25:53

Whilst it does save some money for the business, when women are only on SMP the compay still has to give them the childcare vouchers which can have quite an impact on small businesses and charities. It puts a lot off.

BikeRunSki Wed 06-Jul-11 18:29:42

DH did. He did all the research, paperwork, business case etc. Convinced his boss it wascost neutral and beneficial to all, allowed them to tick their "Family friendly" box and so on.

mollymole Wed 06-Jul-11 18:46:50

as an employer i cannot see why they would not join a scheme - we are a small business and the scheme actually saves us money in National Insurance
they costs are only 2% to us and we use Kiddy Vouchers and it was really easy to set up - just downloaded from Kiddy Voucher web site - filled in our personal bits and sent it off to HMRC who send back agreement within a few weeks

SarkySpanner Wed 06-Jul-11 20:29:38

I agree with HappyMummy that the nonsense over SMP is starting to put firms off. Before this emerged it was relatively easy to argue that they had nothing to lose.

How do that work then, the SMP thing? I thought it was salary sacrifice, so you could only sacrifice what you would have earnt? Our scheme didn't start till I was back from last mat. leave so I didn't need to know about that.

duende Wed 06-Jul-11 22:25:56

I asked my employer politely and they kindly agreed. I didn't have to try particularly hard. I work for a small company (20-30 people) and I am the only person participating in the scheme.

How does I mean, not how do.

mummaberry Thu 07-Jul-11 13:44:29

Have been recomended the Busy Bees company as being very hassle free by the HR person at my office.
Have also made the case to DH to pass on to his - but apparently they are not going to consider the issue untill next year.
Really bloody helpful - Wondering why it isn't compulsory for employers to enable their staff to access a free beneft! sad

mistlethrush Thu 07-Jul-11 13:46:27

My company doesn't actually belong to a scheme - just pay direct to the organisation that would have got the vouchers had they done a voucher scheme - seems to work fine.

bringinghomethebacon Thu 07-Jul-11 15:46:28

There is a little known loophole with the childcare voucher scheme (becoming more well known particularly on mumsnet!) that when a woman is on SMP, her employer must continue to provide childcare vouchers but cannot deduct from SMP as you cannot fall below SMP. So in effect the employer has to pay the childcare vouchers each month and can't deduct from salary and the employee gets free childcare vouchers. I imagine the government will close this loophole soon but for the moment, if known by the employer it obviously is a large cost. Otherwise you could not tell them about the loophole and sell them the benefits as set out on the voucher providers' websites and hope they don't know about it!

My firm administer payments themselves as well rather than via a scheme which is fine as long as straightforward.

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